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Shawn Husk
05-22-2008, 10:07 PM
Just a couple of questions regarding these pipes.

Does anyone know who actually turns these bagpipes? I know Murray Henderson designed them but who turns them?

Also, any one out there playing a set of these? If so what are your thoughts?

Thanks,

Shawn

Andrew Lenz
05-22-2008, 10:18 PM
All I know is that it is not Naill. I have my suspicions but if someone knows for sure who is, I'm curious.

Andrew

Andrew Lenz
05-22-2008, 10:57 PM
A little birdie told me that it's Jet Engineering, suspicion correct. It's a computer lathe shop—they turn out a number of 'house brands' too.

Andrew

David
05-23-2008, 12:03 AM
So that's why certain poly pipes have parts that also fit my fully automated pressure-stabilized, soil tension sensor-controlled underground irrigation and fertilizer delivery system! I always wondered about that combing and beading on the Delrin overflow valve shunt pipe.

Troy Jesse
05-23-2008, 06:32 AM
Wallace bagpipes is one brand, and they make no bones about it.

phyx
05-23-2008, 06:42 AM
All I know is that both sets of Strathmores I've heard sound superb. They look nice, well made, and sound great. Then again, those I've heard were played by Gr. 3 and Gr. 1 pipers (one was with the 78th Frasers) and their tone was very very nice. I was told that they tune and lock in very easily, and they're a pleasure to play--they certainly sounded like it.

Hope this helps.

piper94
05-23-2008, 06:48 AM
hi guys, i worked in Jet (still have mates in there), and they stopped bagpipe production couple years back, focusing entirely on their core business of plastics machining, they were so busy it was unreal....

hope this helps....

Mac.

YetaNutterPiper
05-23-2008, 07:38 AM
I play Strathmores and I like the sound, but my opinion isn't that experienced as I just competed solo for the first time this year. My instructor has continued to say how nice they sound and how well they lock in. In my first competition two out of three judges commented on my score sheets as to the nice drone sound. The only sound I can really compare against is a set of Dunbars that a fellow student has. He plays them great and they tune well, but don't hum quite like my Strathmores.

One more disclaimer. I play cane reeds which may also enhance what others are hearing.

FWIW.

JRM
05-23-2008, 08:02 AM
hi guys, i worked in Jet (still have mates in there), and they stopped bagpipe production couple years back, focusing entirely on their core business of plastics machining, they were so busy it was unreal....

hope this helps....

Mac.

Thanks for clearing up that myth.

Wulls
05-23-2008, 09:02 AM
Don't know what Myth......
One corner of Jet engineerings workshop is taken up by Wallace bagpipes. Whether they still make pipes for other customers I do not know but Bagpipes are still being made under Jets roof.

JRM
05-23-2008, 09:06 AM
hmmm...thought we had definitive info from inside via piper94's post. Guess not.

Andrew Lenz
05-23-2008, 10:12 AM
hmmm...thought we had definitive info from inside via piper94's post. Guess not.

I'd always take a first post from an anonymous person with minimal profile details with a BIG grain of salt.

The Strathmore pipes should sound pretty good, since from what I've heard (I haven't measured myself), they basically have Naill bores. . . but Naill seasons their ABW much longer than Jet plus has a lot more experience and a reputation with fine detailing of pipes.

Andrew

JRM
05-23-2008, 11:19 AM
I hadn't noticed the post count on that person.

Strathmmore pipes do sound very nice indeed, and I find the detailing and wood quality to be quite good judging from the ones I've handled.

gatormac
05-23-2008, 12:34 PM
Don't know what Myth......
One corner of Jet engineerings workshop is taken up by Wallace bagpipes.

Yeah, I just did a tour of Wallace bagpipes a couple of weeks ago, and it is part of Jet Engineering. They didn't indicate it was any kind of a secret. They are both right there in the same building and they give tours openly. They never said anything about making Strathmore pipes though.

David Marshall
05-23-2008, 03:34 PM
They are very confidential about who they do work for..and rightly so.

Troy Jesse
05-23-2008, 04:15 PM
I guess I should have said Jet and Wallace are sister companies, as that is how Wallace describes it.

Andrew Lenz
05-23-2008, 09:26 PM
How to tell a well finished set of bagpipes:
http://www.bagpipejourney.com/articles/quality-bagpipes.shtml

Andrew

JRM
05-24-2008, 02:02 PM
Last time I looked, this was the info I had read about Strathmore pipes. Must be pretty good quality control and detailing for those people to play them.


Strathmore Results for 2007

The following major prizes were all won using a full set of Strathmore Bagpipes.

1st - Argyllshire Gathering Gold Medal

1st - Royal Braemar Highland Gathering Gold Medal

1st - Masters Invitational (Glasgow) Championship

1st - MacGregor Memorial Piobaireachd

Strathmore Results for 2006

1st - The Glenfiddich Championship
Strathmore chanter

1st - The Glenfiddich Piobaireachd
Strathmore chanter

2nd - The Glenfiddich Championship
Strathmore chanter

2nd - The Glenfiddich Piobaireachd
Strathmore chanter

1st Clasp - The Northern Meeting
Complete set of Strathmore Bagpipes

Some of the other major Strathmore chanter results in 2006 were:

2nd Clasp - The Northern Meeting

1st & 2nd A Grade MSR - The Northern Meeting

1st Gold Medal - Argyllshire Gathering

1st A Grade March - Argyllshire Gathering

1st Braemar Gold Medal

1st Clasp - Skye Gathering

1st Dunvegan Medal - Skye Gathering

1st March - Cowal Gathering

1st Overall - Springbank Invitational

1st & 2nd Highlands & Islands Invitational Piobaireachd

1st Overall - Scottish Pipers Association

1st Overall - Uist & Barra
Strathmore Bagpipe Results - 2005

1st Master’s Solo Invitational [Glasgow]
complete set of Strathmore pipes

1st Scottish Piper’s Grade A March
complete set of Strathmore pipes

2nd Senior Piobaireachd Oban
complete set of Strathmore pipes

2nd Gold Medal Piobaireachd Oban
complete set of Strathmore pipes

Strathmore Chanter Results - 2005

1st Dunvegan Clasp

1st Braemar Gold Medal

1st Silver Medal Inverness

1st U.S.A. Silver Medal Piobaireachd

1st Canadian Gold Medal Piobaireachd

1st Canadian Bar to Gold Medal Piobaireachd

David Marshall
05-24-2008, 05:26 PM
"but Naill seasons their ABW much longer than Jet plus has a lot more experience and a reputation with fine detailing of pipes.

Andrew"

What is this comment based on? Perhaps true but not sure how it could be verified. The Strathmore sets I have seen have been very nicely finished.

Thomas_Childs
05-24-2008, 06:01 PM
I for one absolutely love my ABW Strathmore wood chanter. It is subperb!

JRM
05-24-2008, 06:34 PM
The Strathmore pipes should sound pretty good, since from what I've heard (I haven't measured myself), they basically have Naill bores. . . but Naill seasons their ABW much longer than Jet plus has a lot more experience and a reputation with fine detailing of pipes.

Andrew

Whats the source of your information Andrew?

For the record I think that Naill pipes are great.

On another note, experience comes with time and effort, and reputation comes with time and proven track record via the product don't you think? Naill has been in business for decades. Strathmore is a relative newcomer to the market at about 3 years. I think they've both demonstrated that they produce a qaulity product. As have others.

A. Shack
05-24-2008, 06:35 PM
My Strathmores are immaculate in sound and finish. I know a lot of people who also own Strathmores, from basic sets through to full silvers, and they are all very happy with them.

Shawn, feel free to contact me for more info if you wish. Can't tell you who turns them, nor do I care really, but I've got some good high res pics of mine among other things.

Al

Andrew Lenz
05-25-2008, 01:12 AM
Rather than me give away my sources—I talk to so many people, half the time I can't remember anyway—how about we have folks post some measurements of the Strathmore and Naill products? Then we can independently confirm the assertion.

Just to be clear, I am not a piping retailer/supplier nor have any financial stake in any of this. I just try to share information.

Andrew

jsragman77
05-25-2008, 08:06 AM
Whats the source of your information Andrew?

For the record I think that Naill pipes are great.

On another note, experience comes with time and effort, and reputation comes with time and proven track record via the product don't you think? Naill has been in business for decades. Strathmore is a relative newcomer to the market at about 3 years. I think they've both demonstrated that they produce a qaulity product. As have others.

Bobby,

Why not just provide a link to your Strathmore/Gibson site? Do you like the Strathmores as well as your Gibsons?

Mark

The Pilot
05-25-2008, 02:49 PM
Since Murray Henderson was an agent for Naill for many years it would not be a huge surprise to find that there were similarities between them and Strathmores. He will have tweaked bits here and there to get the sound he was after.

Iain

Scratcher
05-25-2008, 03:26 PM
. . but Naill seasons their ABW much longer than Jet plus has a lot more experience and a reputation with fine detailing of pipes.

Andrew

Drivel.
I have a set of Naills downstairs with hairline cracks in the bass top where the unseasoned wood has split. They use what they can get like everybody else.
Wouldn't criticise the quality of workmanship though.
Scratch

Andrew Lenz
05-25-2008, 04:04 PM
As a gold medalist, of whom I am fond, once said, "Even very good pipes may crack." Hairline cracks aren't necessarily indicative of unseasoned wood, it's an natural product. However, yes, poorly seasoned wood would be more prone to cracking.

And not all makers use the same sources for wood. There are companies selling aged ABW and I know of at least one maker buying it and using it.

Andrew

jsragman77
05-25-2008, 06:07 PM
I tried searching "seasoned vs unseasoned" but can't find the posts. This comes up periodically.

Well seasoned wood will tend to split with more regularity than unseasoned wood. Unseasoned wood moves much more than seasoned wood - mounts, ferrules, caps, and bushes come loose.

Each piece will have a measure of oiliness evident when reaming but this is no indication of the degree to which the piece was seasoned. Some pieces may be reamed producing only dust - the swarth doesn't even pile up on the flutes of the reamer. Other pieces of well seasoned wood may be oily - the swarth piles up and must be cleared even when penetrating only 1/2-inch at a time.

I certainly wouldn't claim the maker was using green wood because of a few hairlines.

Mark

Andrew Lenz
05-25-2008, 08:40 PM
Geez, Mark, you had to get all technical on me. Yes, green wood doesn't split, drying green wood may split—and may warp and shrink too, though we weren't talking about that specifically. Later on, both pipes originating in green wood or seasoned wood, once aged (months/years), can split/crack with moisture and temperature changes.

Andrew

JRM
05-25-2008, 08:40 PM
Bobby,

Why not just provide a link to your Strathmore/Gibson site? Do you like the Strathmores as well as your Gibsons?

Mark


As a matter of fact I like a number of pipes by a number of pipe makers that I've had the opportunity to hear and play extensively over the years. Strathmore, Naill, Dunbar, Gibson, McCallum, Gillanders and Macleod, Sinclair, Fletcher, MacDonald, MacDougall, Henderson, Glen, ...to name but a few. I fail to see what your question has to do with the post however. Do you dispute that

"....experience comes with time and effort, and reputation comes with time and proven track record via the product? Naill has been in business for decades. Strathmore is a relative newcomer to the market at about 3 years. I think they've both demonstrated that they produce a quality product. As have others."


I believe that all of the information provided above is factual and easily verified by anyone.

David Marshall
05-25-2008, 10:17 PM
"And not all makers use the same sources for wood. There are companies selling aged ABW and I know of at least one maker buying it and using it."

I agree different makers use different suppliers and often several suppliers. What company sells aged blackwood? I'd love to know as I couldn't find them.

In my recent and pretty extensive research on wood suppliers I have been told across the board that by the time the pipemaker gets the wood it is about 5 months old and not ready for making into a bagpipe. The clarinet companies get the same wood from the same suppliers. Buffet and Selmer for example put the wood away for 5 years before use.

Andrew Lenz
05-26-2008, 12:13 AM
I believe the name of the aged ABW supplier came up here at BDF in the last few months. Unfortunately, I didn't file it away in my brain since I have no plans to ever order any ABW—economy of what brain cells I have left! Atherton uses them and maybe others do too, I don't know—it's much more expensive.

Andrew

Roger Huth
05-26-2008, 01:46 AM
I was at a friendly recital at the beginning of this month.
Andrew Wright played a new set of silver and ivorine Naill pipes with a Strathmore chanter. They sounded tremendous, as you would expect. So did he.
Later in the evening the excellent amateur piper Dr Ian Graham (spelling) played a stunning looking full silver Strathmores. He'd waited a year to get them. They also sounded tremendous. So much so that the pro soloist Steve Watterston took them from Ian's shoulder, when he had finished of course, to play them himself.
What a night.

Roger

jsragman77
05-26-2008, 09:15 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: jsragman77</div><div class="ubbcode-body">

Bobby,

Why not just provide a link to your Strathmore/Gibson site? Do you like the Strathmores as well as your Gibsons?

Mark


As a matter of fact I like a number of pipes by a number of pipe makers that I've had the opportunity to hear and play extensively over the years. Strathmore, Naill, Dunbar, Gibson, McCallum, Gillanders and Macleod, Sinclair, Fletcher, MacDonald, MacDougall, Henderson, Glen, ...to name but a few. I fail to see what your question has to do with the post however. Do you dispute that

"....experience comes with time and effort, and reputation comes with time and proven track record via the product? Naill has been in business for decades. Strathmore is a relative newcomer to the market at about 3 years. I think they've both demonstrated that they produce a quality product. As have others."


I believe that all of the information provided above is factual and easily verified by anyone. </div></div>

The post has to do with the Strathmores and I'm not disputing contest results. You made it a point to highlight their prize winning pedigree. I'm simply asking if you like them better than your Gibsons. As a vendor of both, you've surely formed an opinion by now. If you've no opinion or would rather not make a declaration of preference, just say so.

I don't concur with your opinions on "experience" and "reputation." In my opinion, experience comes with quality exposure, not just "time and effort," that's why qualified instruction remains in demand.

Reputations are more complicated than "time and proven track record," particularly if one looks at a product beyond its utilitarian function.

Mark

JRM
05-26-2008, 10:43 AM
I like them both, and other brands, for different reasons. Each produces a distinctly different type of sound and has a different look that I appreciate.

Is it not possible to like a variety? I have more than 1 pair of pants, more than 1 shirt, more than 1 tie, nmore than 1 pair of shoes. It doesn't mean I don't like them all.

I disagree with your assertions regarding experience and reputation. Experience is accumulated, reputations are earned and formed over time. Everyone is well aware of which brands you favour, and you are entitled to your preferences. I still fail to see what your comments have to do with the question or topic. I don't work for, nor am I being prompted by or paid by Naill, Gibson, or Murray Henderson for my comments - all of which have acquired reputations, experience, and opinions that I, and others, value much higher than some others. I believe they have earned their reputations.

Roger seems to appreciate more than 1 brand, so do a number of others that have posted here. Am I not permitted the same courtesy, or is there some other motive for the turn in this conversation?

When someone makes a claim about the quality and integrity of this pipemaker or that pipemaker, or even one member over another, I feel that they should be able to substantiate the claim and that it can be independently verified. If they can, then do so, if not, then say so and let it go.

I'm done with this side-track, it has nothing to do with the topic and I encourage the moderators to return it to the original topic.

Wulls
05-26-2008, 11:14 AM
I like them both etc......

I'm done with this side-track, it has nothing to do with the topic and I encourage the moderators to return it to the original topic.

:shrug: I'm struggling to see how comparing two sets.... one of which was the subject of this thread is "sidetracking".


Just a couple of questions regarding these pipes......
Also, any one out there playing a set of these? If so what are your thoughts?


Keep on posting your thoughts......as far as I can see this topic has not strayed far from the question raised in the original post.

Dave Gallagher
05-26-2008, 11:41 AM
...." I like them both.."

Thats the kind of answer you give your wife when she asks you about a dress. You say that to her to avoid an arguement if you did not pick the one she likes.

jsragman77
05-26-2008, 06:47 PM
Didn't mean to upset you Bobby/JRM/Rob M. Is it too much to ask the three of you to quantify the characteristics of the pipe so that interested parties might be better informed?

Using the "cut and paste" feature to post prizes won by pipers playing the product doesn't really give the reader much to grasp.

Statements that do not quantify:
1. "My pal in Toronto plays gr. 1 and he says they're good."
2. "Look at all the prizes won by this product."
3. "I sell them and I only sell what sells."
4. "I got a dozen crystals and six stunning Mood rings when I upgraded to full mounted art. ivory."

Statements that do quantify:
1. "I installed a pair of EZ tenors and they tuned just at the hemp line (476 Hz) right out of the box - dead steady too."
2. "They seem to take less air than my Grabwells when using the same reeds."
3. "I live in Phoenix, have played them infrequently for the last three years and, so far, all the fitments have stayed put."
4. "I can tune out as far as I want on the pins and they strike-in with the same ease, every time."
5. "The combing, beading, fit, and finish is unbelievable - click here to see close-up pics."
6. "Much easier to reed and steadier than my Grabwells."

Some of the usefull statements require the piper to compare the praiseworthy pipe against another pipe.

Mark

Roger Huth
05-27-2008, 01:07 AM
Well, Dr Ian Graham had cane drone reeds in his Strathmores when I heard them. I remember being surprised when he took a tenor drone from out of it's stock to check it for whatever and I saw the cane reed. Fully set up with Murray Henderson cane reeds. That for me proves a good pipe. Being able to set it with cane with excellent results. Plus he kept checking to see if his middle tenor was sounding, which it was. Another good sign.

Roger

JRM
05-27-2008, 05:38 AM
I have no interest in sparring with you Mark. As usual you want to resorted to inuendo and insults to illicit an argument.

The simple fact is, you have an agenda, I do not.

Plenty of people, including myself, have already stated their personal opinions and experiences regarding Strathmore bagpipes which you obviously do not accept.

I do believe there are questions from others that remain unanswered. Perhaps someone could direct their energies towards answering those instead of this little side-track.

jsragman77
05-27-2008, 08:12 AM
Who better to field questions than the guy selling the pipe?

Not a single post of yours in this thread has given an interested piper anything on which to base a decision unless a prize list comprises qualitative product evaluation. I don't assume the full credit pertaining to a prize list attributes entirely to the product.

There's no ambush here Bobby. Asking which pipe you prefer is something I hadn't imagined would elicit such a defensive response.

My thanks to Roger for offering useful information.

Mark

JRM
05-27-2008, 09:40 AM
Although it's been stated numerous times in other threads, perhaps this will feed your need for controversy and be clear enough for you then:

When I am interested in a Gibson sound - I go for Gibson, when I am interested in a Robertson sound I go for a Robertson, when I'm interested in a Henderson type of sound I go for a Dunbar, When I want a Naill type of sound I go for a Naill, when I want a Strathmore sound I go for a Strathmore, When I am interested in a David Glen sound, I reach for a David Glen. If you think they all sound the same, then that's your problem. If you think that one has to sound better than the other, that again is your problem. I like others can appreciate the differences and the sound of each independently of the others. I think they are all excellent sounding bagpipe brands as are others.

John McCain
05-27-2008, 02:33 PM
...when I want a Strathmore sound I go for a Strathmore, ...

For those of us who haven't heard this brand, what is it like? What are the sound qualities, is it easy to reed and set-up, how does it compare with the other makes you mentioned? From your post, it appears you are familiar enough with all of them to give a reasoned assessment.

Best, John

Shawn Husk
05-27-2008, 09:12 PM
So I heard Murray on a DVD called Piping Live! from 2005 playing his Strathmores and chanter. They sounded great to me, of course Murray could probably make ANY bagpipe sound great. Not taking ANYTHING away from Strathmore here, just stating FACT.

My question for those who've played both Strathmores and Naills is: are these two makes of drones basically the same in sound and overall characteristics? Or if there are distinct differences could you please describe them?

Thanks!

Shawn

phyx
05-28-2008, 05:49 AM
I haven't played the two, but I've heard the two. I don't know their exact setup, other than one guy played Strathmores with a McCallum ABW chanter (nice btw), and the other played Naills with a Dunbar poly chanter. Both were lower grade pipers. The Naills to me sounded okay...but that's it...like well tuned bagpipes. The Strathmores sounded good...but had more depth to the sound, more presence if you will. It could be due to the piper's abilities to play, but both were in tune, and both sounded good. The difference was that the Strathmores had a wow factor that the Naills did not. The Strathmore sound was bolder and more powerful. The Naills were a bit mellower and smoother.

They both looked very very nice though--well crafted. Now that was the only set of Naills I've heard in person. Keep in mind that my comparisons come from two lower grade pipers so to me, the playing ability factor is pretty much gone out the window--this opinion is based solely on the sound that the pipes could produce when played by the average piper--not by pros.

I have heard another set of Strathmores played by a member of the 78th Frasers and his pipes were amazing! But then again, he's a Gr. 1 piper who could probably make any chunk of wood sound nice. I don't think you'll go wrong with either make, to be honest. They both produce a very pleasing sound, are well made, and should last you a very long time. They just have slightly different characteristics.

Søren E. Larsen
05-28-2008, 06:04 AM
Make of drone reeds and how there are set up have a huge impact on drone sound.

phyx
05-28-2008, 07:07 AM
Make of drone reeds and how there are set up have a huge impact on drone sound.

Exactly...that's why I included in my comparison that I have no idea what reeds were used and what the set up was. It definitely makes a big impact on the sound.

Although, if I'm not mistaken, the Gr. 1 piper had a cane bass, and a bannatyne hybrid bag (tenor reeds unknown).

jsragman77
05-28-2008, 08:00 AM
No agenda here folks.

1. Air-efficiency - Do they take more or less air when reeded the same as Gibson, Naill, pre-1920 Henderson, etc...?
2. Reedability - Do they easily accept the same reeds as Gibson, Naill, pre-1920 Hendersons, etc...?
3. Ease of strike-in - Are they touchy with certain reeds?
4. Volume - Are they more robust than Gibson, Naill, pre-1920 Henderson, etc...?
5. Timbre - Smooth, buzzy, warm, edgy, full, thin, etc...when compared to Gibson, Naill, pre-1902 Hendersons, etc...?
6. Balance - Tenor/bass dominant (using EZs for example) or "just right?" Especially here, a comparison to other brands, similarly reeded, is helpful.
7. Steadiness - Can you vary the pressure by quite a bit (using EZs) and still not hear interference beats from the tenors? Again, a comparison to other brands, similarly reeded, is helpful.

Some of these have been partially answered. They are but a few that I'd hope to see in a piper's substantive, objective appraisal of a pipe from a strictly utilitarian standpoint - especially here, in the technical arena of the Forum.

Comments about fit, finish, and wood are welcome, at least to me, but maybe these are better left to PMs so as not to offend.

Mark

ffgolden
05-28-2008, 08:29 PM
I have a set of Naills I got from Murry Henderson in 2002. They are great pipes. The tone is really nice but I wish the bass was more powerful. I am curious how the Strathmore bass compares if anyone has any insight.

John McCain
05-29-2008, 12:27 PM
I am curious how the Strathmore bass compares if anyone has any insight.

Apparently the sound qualities and functionality of this make are indescribable.

Best, John

One Pipes
05-29-2008, 06:13 PM
I have a set of Naills I got from Murry Henderson in 2002. They are great pipes. The tone is really nice but I wish the bass was more powerful. I am curious how the Strathmore bass compares if anyone has any insight
In my humble opinion I'd say the Strathmore has more bass and probably less tenor than Naill I'd say the Naill tenor almost borders on harsh whereas the Strathmore balances better with the bass.I like both pipes I would give the edge on sound to Strathmore and fit and finish to Naill.

Shawn Husk
05-29-2008, 10:57 PM
One Pipes, thank you very much. That is exactly the kind of tonal description I was hoping to hear.

Shawn

Andrew Lenz
05-29-2008, 11:07 PM
One Pipes, just out of curiosity, what are you basing your opinion on? Was it hearing other performers/bandmates? What drone reeds were being used with each set? (Just since your profile says you play Dunbars.)

Thanks,
Andrew

scotchboiler
05-29-2008, 11:34 PM
I have played a Strathmore with Henderson carbon tenors (I think), a cane bass, and a sheepskin bag. The overall sound was very nice and balanced. While the bass seemed more powerful than a Naill typically would be, it was not overwhelming. Perhaps they might be likened to a 1930's or 40's Henderson, as opposed to a pre-WW I set. There were no issues in regard to fit and finish that I could see.

phyx
05-30-2008, 05:10 AM
Judging from the two Strathmores I've heard and the 1 Naill I've heard, I'd say the bass in the Strathmore has more presence. The bass didn't over power the tenors, but it definitely had more to it than the Naill. I know that one was reeded with a cane bass, the other Strathmore, I've no idea what was in it but I'm pretty sure it was not cane. Also, I have no idea what reeds were in the Naill set.

I know without knowing the reeds that it's of little value, but hopefully it helps some.

Andrew Lenz
05-30-2008, 02:49 PM
Speaking of Strathmore pipes, I had contact message off of my website yesteday out of the blue from a piper who owns a set of them. All his plastic hemp stops are falling off. His instructor's pipes' stops are falling off too.
(Someone asked about verification about some of the things I say . . . I get these kinds of messages from random pipers on an ongoing basis about different makes—that's just one of the sources of my information.)

Does anyone have first hand experience fixing this problem using the existing pieces? (Tapping, hemp, and glue?)

Andrew

David Marshall
05-30-2008, 04:10 PM
He should have ABW hempt stops installed. They will hold very well. Likely about $80 to $100 to do the job plus shipping.

Andrew Lenz
05-30-2008, 04:23 PM
That was one of my first thoughts too, but I was wondering about making do with existing parts. So far he's tried white glue, Krazy glue, rubber cement and
Gorilla Glue (as recommended by the Mr. Henderson)—all failed.

Andrew

cullodenpipes
05-30-2008, 05:36 PM
So are the pictures on this page JET?

http://www.wallacebagpipes.com/the_team/index.htm


hi guys, i worked in Jet (still have mates in there), and they stopped bagpipe production couple years back, focusing entirely on their core business of plastics machining, they were so busy it was unreal....

hope this helps....

Mac.

Andrew Lenz
05-30-2008, 06:20 PM
Wallace Bagpipes
Anniesland Business Park
Netherton Road
Glasgow, Lanarkshire G13 1EU

Jet Engineering Plastics Ltd
D4, Anniesland Business Park,
Netherton Rd,
Glasgow, Lanarkshire G13 1EU

It's not a big secret.

Andrew

One Pipes
05-31-2008, 07:13 AM
One Pipes, just out of curiosity, what are you basing your opinion on? Was it hearing other performers/bandmates? What drone reeds were being used with each set? (Just since your profile says you play Dunbars.)

Thanks,
Andrew

Andew,
We have 4 sets of Strathmores in the band.I think most of the them are set up with Henderson reeds,polycarbonate blades and some carbon fiberblades blades. The set I play(Dunbars) are out of commision right now due to a broken middle bass so I'm playing my other set.(Naill).We have about 4 sets of Naills in the band and they're set up with all different types of reeds,Selbie,Ezeedrone,etc.

phyx
06-02-2008, 05:55 AM
Speaking of Strathmore pipes, I had contact message off of my website yesteday out of the blue from a piper who owns a set of them. All his plastic hemp stops are falling off. His instructor's pipes' stops are falling off too.
(Someone asked about verification about some of the things I say . . . I get these kinds of messages from random pipers on an ongoing basis about different makes—that's just one of the sources of my information.)

Does anyone have first hand experience fixing this problem using the existing pieces? (Tapping, hemp, and glue?)


I've got some plastic hemp stops falling off my Gibsons too--I just put 'em in place, wrapped a couple of wraps of teflon tape around them (and the top half of my hemp). Seems to work fine so far. I honestly wasn't expecting the hemp stops to fall off so I've no idea what to use to keep it there permanently, though I was told (by Kim at Gibson) that if my ferrules come off to "just use superglue" to put them back on. My guess is that it would work for the hemp stops too.

YetaNutterPiper
06-02-2008, 02:18 PM
Gibsons had a problem. I would have thought from the prior post only Strathmores could have such a problem :)

Larz
06-02-2008, 06:45 PM
I have a set of Gibsons and had the hemp retainers fall off as well. I tried epoxy, which did not hold, I then went to Gorilla Glue which at first did not hold well either.

However, on the next attempt, I roughed up both the retainers and the slides and made sure to slightly dampen both parts as per the glues instructions; taped them in place overnight and they have been on solid for about a year and a half.

JRM
06-03-2008, 05:52 AM
My gut reaction is that if all of those adhesives are not working for you, then you're not preparing the surfaces to remove the old adhesive properly before applying the new adhesive, or not following the directions on the adhesive.

Wulls
06-03-2008, 09:49 AM
on the next attempt, I roughed up both the retainers and the slides and made sure to slightly dampen both parts as per the glues instructions
:thumb: Spot on Larz..... I know it sounds weird to wet the parts before gluing but Gorilla glue is water activated. When you wet the surfaces the glue bonds to both of them then the whole lot cures as the moisture permeates through the glue layer. If you bond something with gorilla glue and it falls off again there is something seriously wrong with either the parts themselfs or the application of the glue.

Back to the original question...... Does anyone know for sure who makes strathmore pipes ????

Andrew Lenz
06-03-2008, 09:30 PM
If we're are looking for a certified letter, ain't gonna happen. As already mentioned, Jet Engineering plays their cards close to the chest. I may be wrong, but I suspect all we'll get is off-the-record whispered answers from knowledgeable third-parties.

The two that know for sure are Jim Wallace and Murray Henderson and I'm not even going to bother asking them . . .

Andrew

gatormac
06-04-2008, 05:24 AM
Who is Jim Wallace?

Personally, I would never buy a bagpipe without knowing who made it. I'm not saying I have to know the specific turner, and I don't have an problem with modern CNC machinery, but I want to know what company makes it and where. That's just a matter of principle to me- if I'm going to pay the money, I'm going to have to be told. There are plenty of open pipe making companies out there to choose from. Nothing against Strathmore- they may be great pipes, but there are lots of great pipes.

On the subject of hemp stops- why don't pipe makers just make them wood/integral with the tuning pin? Seems like that would avoid the problem of them coming loose. I really don't see the need for a separate piece there.

pancelticpiper
06-04-2008, 06:06 AM
On the subject of hemp stops- why don't pipe makers just make them wood/integral with the tuning pin? Seems like that would avoid the problem of them coming loose. I really don't see the need for a separate piece there.

On pipes I've owned, the seperate hemp stops are used with pipes having metal slides fitted. The pin must be turned down so that the slide can be fitted on, meaning that you don't have the shoulder at the top (integral "hemp stop" I suppose) that you would on pipes with plain wood pins.

phyx
06-04-2008, 06:24 AM
Exactly. On pipes without slides, the hempstops are just an integral part of the pin and they have to be turned down in order to fit the slides on.

gatormac
06-04-2008, 07:17 AM
Thanks for the explanation- that makes sense.

Charlie Rutan
06-04-2008, 11:52 AM
Well Im sitting here waiting for my new bw Strathmore chanter to arrive, so:
Id like to hear everyone;s opinions particularly on the chanter;
regarding tone, reeding, ergonomics, pitch, quirks. be descriptive.



.

Michael Flemming
06-04-2008, 01:19 PM
On pipes I've owned, the seperate hemp stops are used with pipes having metal slides fitted. The pin must be turned down so that the slide can be fitted on, meaning that you don't have the shoulder at the top (integral "hemp stop" I suppose) that you would on pipes with plain wood pins.

I have a set of Dunbar's with David Marshall silver slides and ferrules which have plain wood hemp stops. I prefer it that way because I think that separate stops would just weaken the wood at a critical point. The silver is 0.03 inches thick. I can assure you that reducing the radius of the integral wood hemp stop by 1/32 inch doesn't reduce its effectiveness one bit. If you think about it, that is probably less than the thickness of a strand of hemp.

gatormac
06-04-2008, 01:46 PM
My MacLellans have silver slides- the hemp stops are wood, and it is so seamless it seems like one integral piece, however looking closely, I think they might be separate pieces glued on. I'm not sure. I can't see any dividing line, but the inner wood seems a bit darker than the outer hemp stop. If they are separate, it is an incredibly good job.

mattpiper
06-04-2008, 04:42 PM
Here's an up close pic of a MacLellan hemp stop (from my old Millenniums): The outer piece is light cocobolo, and you can see the two wood (and the absolute precision in which they were mated!)
http://www.mattpiper.com/shop/millennium/08.jpg

David D.
06-04-2008, 07:07 PM
Well Im sitting here waiting for my new bw Strathmore chanter to arrive, so:
Id like to hear everyone;s opinions particularly on the chanter;
regarding tone, reeding, ergonomics, pitch, quirks. be descriptive.



.


I've had good luck with McCann and Shepherd reeds and find it easy to tune and reed. I'm not sure about the Hz but it tunes to my drones about the same as my 6 year old (Mk II?) Shepherd poly chanter. The chanter cracks and projects the embellishments and has a rich vibrant presence and timbre with no shrill or piercing qualities. No quirks, problems, or regrets, she's a beauty.

Wulls
06-05-2008, 04:52 AM
I see absolutely no good reason to make a hemp stop from wood.
At that thickness the wood has absolutely no strength whatsoever. An ivory or plastic one would at least provide some support for the thinner wood section.
Having said that I have seldom seen a tenor drone cracking at the top of the bore with or without a hemp stop fitted. Bass mids are usually the ones to go as the wood is thinnest there due to the larger bore. I have fitted ivory hemp stops to every set I have owned JIC....

mattpiper
06-05-2008, 09:29 AM
I see the hemp stop as a device for... Stopping hemp. If it can support the wood from cracking or splitting, that's really awesome too, but it's primary function is in its name. :)

Ryan LGY
06-24-2008, 03:52 AM
Recent clips of the man himself, Murray Henderson.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RJjVLa2L_QY
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vr3MrUZCJqA&amp;feature=related

I figure he's playing his strathmores.

Ryan Lee.

Curt
06-25-2008, 10:37 AM
Those are really nice recordings. Lots of harmonics. I really am not big on clips and feel you need to hear a pipe live, but I would hazard a guess that those pipes sound as good as Roger stated. Of course we all knew that since he has heard them live and is more than a knowledgeable piper.