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chrisyln
04-16-2012, 02:43 PM
HI Does anyone know what The Barren Rocks of Aden
was called before it was called Barren Rocks of Aden:doh:

Klondike Waldo
04-16-2012, 04:08 PM
How about "The Burning Sands Of Egypt":thumb:

Pip01
04-16-2012, 07:20 PM
Greetings,Chrisyln & Klondike Waldo,

"The Barren Rocks of Aden" was, I do believe, a fairly
popular song times back... and was, in so far as I know
or have ever heard, only known by its original song title.

I have heard an old, old 78 recording of it but cannot now
recall by whom it was sung (from, I think, the late 20s or
the early 30s).

Again, in so far as I know or have ever heard, that it later
became a pipe tune was due to its suitability to and for it.

"The Burning Sands of Egypt" was (and again, as memory
serves) the second title of what was later called "The Road to
the Isles," the first title for the tune being "The Paps of Jura."

This tune was written as a pipe tune... though the name of the
composer (a famous Pipe Major?) now escapes me.

Perhaps others can weigh in with more (and perhaps more
accurate) details.

Regards,

Pip01

Regards,

David
04-17-2012, 04:36 AM
Here's a snippet that I came across on Road to the Isles names:


It is not unusual for tunes to keep their format but be renamed, and thus depending on the date and/or version of the music, could be presented as the same tune under a different title. Prior to the outbreak of the Great War in 1914 Piper John MacLellan had composed a march entitled "The Bens Of Jura". During the South African War he changed the name to "The Highland Brigade’s March To Heilbronn", (MacLellan had by this time enlisted in the Brigade). Thereafter, on being posted to Egypt it was again renamed, this time, "The Burning Sands Of Egypt". Soon after the outbreak of the Great War words were added by a Scots minister, and, in its newly adopted poetic form, appeared as, "The Road To The Isles", which although criticised as being steeped in sentimentality, became a favourite in the music halls. (MURRAY 287-289) BAGPIPES IN WAR / Greg Dawson

http://www.nefa.net/archive/songmusicdance/pipes/war.htm

Klondike Waldo
04-17-2012, 04:54 AM
Pip01, David, thanks.

David
04-17-2012, 10:33 PM
What is great fun in title and melody sleuthing is to find out how often the composer as we know it was born several generations after the actual first known appearance of the melody. But as noted before, taking a folk melody, and working it into a two-part pipe tune, then eventually into a 4- or 6-parter, seemed to earn the title of composer in a slightly different sense of the word composer than we use today.

Barren Rocks is said to have been unnamed by the composer James Mauchline in 1843 (Roderick Cannon 1988). That can lead to a plethora of names in a tune that became verfy popular, receiving lyrics, and being played on other instruments, especially as it was then a new style of tune on the pipes. Maybe it was based on the infamous spa-sitter the Baron Rauch of Baden.

Pip01
04-18-2012, 05:58 AM
Ah Ha!!

The tune for Barren Rocks... written in 1843....
by James Mauchline!

Grand!! Just bloody grand!! How lucky!!...
we Forumonians!!... to have such a place...
and such a resource... ready to hand!! :)

Now if I can just recall the name of the old
blind harper (1700s?) who wrote the tune
"The Bright Ring of Day" (in the English)
that later became "The Dawning of the
Day."

Regards... and Thanks... to All,

Pip01

bob864
04-18-2012, 06:36 AM
The version of Barren Rocks of Aden that is in the Seaforth Highlanders book has a significantly different second part. Not as good, imo.

the old marshal
04-18-2012, 07:17 AM
nobody.....I know plays the last two parts....they are wonderful too..!!:shrug:

David
04-18-2012, 07:47 AM
nobody.....I know plays the last two parts....they are wonderful too..!!:shrug:

I had an LP with an assortment of characters, mostly regimental P/Ms, playing classic pipe tunes solo. A real 99p bargain box from Princes Street mabe 40 years ago. A nice version of Barren Rocks in 4 parts was played, very pointed, very bouncy, with a lovely balance of cut-dot-cut-dot and dot-cut-cut-dot phrasing. And so crisp in the fingering. I'd give my left wee finger for that recording.

For all that it is almost thought of as a new piper's march, it is in truth a right challenge to play with the breath of life flowing through it.

sooty piper
04-18-2012, 08:13 AM
You speak truth, David. If only musicality were as popular as virtuosity! An elementary tune, well-played, is aboon the up-tempo finger-wiggling that carries as much soul as a Hanon exercise.

Michael F. Bell
04-18-2012, 10:24 AM
Ah Ha!!


Now if I can just recall the name of the old
blind harper (1700s?) who wrote the tune
"The Bright Ring of Day" (in the English)
that later became "The Dawning of the
Day."

Pip01

Thomas O'Connellan

Paul M Burke
04-18-2012, 02:14 PM
I play the four parts from Logan's Tutor, very few know the third and forth parts. It is an excelent tune.

Paul

acadianpiper
04-18-2012, 02:15 PM
How about "The Burning Sands Of Egypt":thumb:

No, that was an earlier title of "The Road to the Isles" (See "The Piper's Delight" collection, among others), which was also called at one time (originally, according to the A & S Highlanders Collection of Pipe Tunes) "The Bens of Jura".

I'm not sure "The Barren Rocks of Aden" ever had another name. It was published under the existing title in Ross's 1875 collection.

Adam Sanderson
04-19-2012, 12:50 AM
I had an LP with an assortment of characters, mostly regimental P/Ms, playing classic pipe tunes solo. A real 99p bargain box from Princes Street mabe 40 years ago. A nice version of Barren Rocks in 4 parts was played, very pointed, very bouncy, with a lovely balance of cut-dot-cut-dot and dot-cut-cut-dot phrasing. And so crisp in the fingering. I'd give my left wee finger for that recording.

For all that it is almost thought of as a new piper's march, it is in truth a right challenge to play with the breath of life flowing through it.

One Thursday evening at the London Scottish HQ I played the 4 part version of Barren Rocks, (probably not very well, I might add). Roger Huth joined in and continued the tune to make it a 6 parter, then turned to me and said, "Thus, I win". :lol:
Funny the things that stick in your mind.

the old marshal
04-19-2012, 06:25 AM
a bit off topic....but you can play the Pibroch of Donald Dhu.....forever...try Roger with that one....:thumb:

Locke Bar
04-24-2012, 04:02 PM
Would the blind harpers name be Carolan-not sure of the spelling.

Klondike Waldo
04-24-2012, 05:42 PM
Would the blind harpers name be Carolan-not sure of the spelling.

Michael Bell has it, acording to Wikkipedia:
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Dawning of the Day (Irish: Fáinne Geal an Lae) is an old Irish air composed by the blind harpist Thomas Connellan in the 17th Century.[1] [2]
An Irish-language song with this name (Fáinne Geal an Lae) was published by Edward Walsh (1805-1850) in 1847 in Irish Popular Songs and later translated into English as The Dawning of the Day. The melody of this song was used by Irish poet Patrick Kavanagh for his poem, "On Raglan Road".[3]
Raglan Road has been performed by a number of notable artists including: The Dubliners, Sinéad O'Connor, Luke Kelly and Mark Knopfler. This song also goes by the Irish name Fáinne Geal an Lae - literally "The bright ring of the day." It is often played as a march and is one of the first tunes that a student of Irish music will learn.
This is an Aisling where the poet encounters a mysterious beautiful woman who symbolises Ireland - Cáit Ní Dhuibhir, Caitlín Ní Uallacháin, Róisín Dubh etc. In this case, she upbraids him as a frivolous rake and points to the approaching dawn (of freedom from English rule). At the end of the Desmond Rebellions and Nine Years' War, Irish poets were facing their own elimination as a matter of deliberate English policy.

geopat
04-27-2012, 11:00 AM
Have spent over forty years trying to master the 3rd and 4th parts - including on our wedding night on a practice chanter. Possibly too much information:)

Achilles Piper
04-29-2012, 09:51 PM
Barren Rocks is said to have been unnamed by the composer James Mauchline in 1843 (Roderick Cannon 1988). That can lead to a plethora of names in a tune that became verfy popular, receiving lyrics, and being played on other instruments, especially as it was then a new style of tune on the pipes. Maybe it was based on the infamous spa-sitter the Baron Rauch of Baden.

In support of David's suggestion, I have an old copy of "David Glen's Highland Bagpipe Tutor", date unknown, price one shilling and sixpence. Tune number 41 is a 4-part version of Barren Rocks of Aden. The title line just says "Arr. by A MacKellar late Pipe Major 78th Highlanders", but there is also an illuminating footnote which reads:
"This composition was claimed by the late James Mauchline as one of many unnamed compositions composed by him when in the "78th" and which was long anterior to the days of MacKellar. Mauchline always acknowledged MacKellar's Arrangement to be a very great improvement on the original."