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View Full Version : Avoiding the "Thank God I'm Scottish" Folk


Margaret
01-23-2005, 06:19 PM
Has anyone ever experienced the phenomenon of meeting an individual, who is either told or discovers you play the pipes/dances/drums (you of course are in your civvies innocently drinking your cocktail...), and launches into an hour long dissertation on just how scottish they are and all the famous dukes and earl type people they're related to, and what clan society they just joined? Gad, I just once again went through this agony for 45 minutes, and it may take days to recover.... Huge Sigh.

Margaret, going to lay down now.

Pete Walen
01-23-2005, 07:12 PM
Margaret... try "Funny, by you're accent I'd have sowrn you're an American" and walk away.

Celtic Mitch
01-23-2005, 07:18 PM
Please don't hate me here, but I get that more with people living south of my border than in Canuk land. I think it might be due to the fact that because the USA is older than Canada, and the heritage lines back to the old country might be less recent, they feel the need to talk about days of yore. Alot of Canadians that have British ancestors probably are only second or first generation Canadian.

I dunno..just a crazy thought...it's late...I'm out of chocolate....and my cat won't get me a beer out of the fridge. :shrug:

Tommy P.
01-23-2005, 08:27 PM
I think Charles Shulz understood a need in all of us for some form of security, and was trying to tell us through the intellectual character Linus, that it's ok to use a security blanket.

We all have our little blue blankets, some come in the form of a successful career, a beautiful home, a wife & children,......or even just belonging to a family with a history,... embellished or not.

RosieJ
01-23-2005, 09:27 PM
Hmmm. Guess the only times I've had the "Let me tell you about my Scottish ancestors" talk has been when I've been playing the pipes and in The Outfit,aka Kilted. And then, of course, they KNOW you're just DYING to hear every bit of their Scottish ancestry! And no, I'm sorry, I don't know all the clans and tartans! "Oh, dear, just look at the TIME; I gotta go (add an appropriate phrase here).....!"

I wonder if I oughta tell 'em I'm mostly German, ie Penna Deutsch, and only about 1/32 Scottish, if that much? But then I'd probably get the "oh, you're not Scottish and they LET YOU play the pipes??" :shrug:

I thought it was kinda funny once when we played at a parish fair (yep, they're called parishes here in LA, not counties like in the rest of the States) and a guy came up to me and asked me where I was from. When I told him I lived in Baton Rouge, he was pretty disappointed; he said he thought I was from Switzerland. Hmm. Yeah. :rolleyes: *sigh*

ratherbpiping
01-24-2005, 12:36 AM
Mitch,

I think due to Canadian history, and culture, the bagpipe and tartans have just been adopted as our own with less emphasis on the "Fatherland" Friends of mine from England when visiting in Ottawa found it interesting how much emphasis was put on kilted regiment and such when visiting the parlament buildings in Ottawa. Like many parts of the "Empire" the Scots and Irish were "Distributeted" accross the globe.


The US people seem to have this fasination for these things, where as in Canada for the most part it is just accepted.

Jo-Ann
01-24-2005, 03:43 AM
At a Burns' Dinner -- yep, just BEGGIN for some great stories :eek: A woman at whose table I had been seated asked what clan I belong to. I responded that I never joined a clan. Then she asked what clan should I belong to. Feeling that she wouldn't drop the subject, and being that it was an assigned seating dinner, I responded that my grandmother was a sept of Campbell. :thumb:

I just couldn't resist :lol:

Jo-Ann

Celtic Mitch
01-24-2005, 04:47 AM
ha...good story Jo-Ann. You gotta love it.

Back in the day...and I'm not saying what day that was..a band I used to play with when I was a kid went to this festival down in mid Ohio. The locals had never seen a pipe band let alone hear the bagpipes. Because I was a minor, my mother accompanied me as did other band parents.

While the band was doing their performance, the mothers were all standing together listening to locals comment on the band and us being Canadians. It went something like, "You know they wear kilts up in Canada all the time, even to work. And it snows there all the time, even in the summer. Everyone's name has a MAC in front of it". So one of locals noticed that the group of mothers were with the band and my mother having the same sense of humour as I do couldn't resist. When one local asked my mom were they with the band my mother replied "Why yes I am....I am Sammi MACCurtis, this is Lilian MACMurphy and this other lady is Maddie MACIrvine". (yes, drop the MAC and you have the real last names). They left the locals with acknowledging smiles on their faces that they had nailed the Canadian culture and what we are all about! :thumb:

Mike, I have to agree with you...I think seeing kilted Canadian regiments is not only accepted up here but is quite normal...whatever normal is.

Jim Sloan
01-24-2005, 05:53 AM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Jo-Ann:
[QB] At a Burns' Dinner -- yep, just BEGGIN for some great stories :eek: A woman at whose table I had been seated asked what clan I belong to.
--------------------------------------------------

I cut those conversations short by dropping,"my folks are from Northern Ireland".
The looks are classic.
I started taking pleasure in doing this after the band got a letter of reprimand one year after someone in the local Scottish American Society complained we included an Irish set at a concert.

Jim

Rick
01-24-2005, 06:37 AM
I generally respond to the "clan question" by explaining that my father's genealogical work traced our name back to one William Young, who may have come from the Kincadine region of Scotland, but we haven't been able to confirm it. However, since he got married in Philadelphia, PA in 1742, I tend to view myself as an American.

Curt
01-24-2005, 07:06 AM
Nothing wrong with knowing your family history. What is wrong is boring other people with it, if they have no interest. It is just like any other conversation. Some people may have interest in history or the subject at hand and some may not. It seems to me the people that are most bothered by a subject is that they know nothing about it and hence they want to be out of the conversation. Or they don't have pride in the subject matter, so they want to avoid it.

Enjoy,
Curt

phyx
01-24-2005, 07:30 AM
The way I see it is this:

Person is very interested in their family history and find out their clan/tartan/whatever.

Person becomes very interested in Scottish/clan history, researches it, and gets excited about it.

Person then realizes not everyone else seems to care about his/her interest in his/her family/clan history and has no one with which to share the excitement.

Person meets a piper/dancer/drummer affiliated with Scottish arts and assumes that the piper/dancer/drummer might actually be interested in/excited about the same subject.

Person also assumes that engaging said piper/dancer/drummer in conversation might yield even more knowledge to be learned and possibly meet a friend/clan member.

What if you were a mechanic and you met a person who was a gearhead? Would you expect him/her NOT to talk to you about engines and tools? It's a common ground you share and a good place to start a conversation with a possible future friend.

I can understand not wanting to be bothered at times, but you've got to expect people to ask questions and talk about Scottish things should you dress the part. My heritage goes back to Scotland, yet I was asked at a pub recently if I was a "Mick"--probably due to the scally cap I was wearing, my eye color, and muttonchop sideburns. I was polite about it, said that some of my family moved from Scotland to Ireland, before coming to North America, but most came straight from Scotland. He then told me (quite proudly) that he's a "Mick" and was quite happy to meet another "Celt". He told me of his family history and Irish heritage, etc. We talked for a while and I even got a couple of free pints out from him.

Maybe you should take the time to listen to their stories or history, or do some research of your own...you might actually enjoy it. Either that, or quit dressing the part. It's nice to say that "just because I wear a kilt and pipe/drum/dance doesn't mean people should assume I am Scottish or know everything about Scotland"....but people do that--especially people who are interested in/passionate about Scottish history and music--it kind of comes with the territory.

The only other solution I can offer is to tell them up front that you don't know/care about the subject or you're not interested in talking to them about it. It might seem rude, but it's no less rude than sitting through their conversations only to make fun of or complain about them here.

Just my 2 cents...

ChickaDee
01-24-2005, 07:41 AM
Margaret- You poor dear....here, allow me to pour you another mogul masher!!! :D

It seems some people perceive only those with direct Scottish lineage would want to play bagpipes. When I first started learning, I heard that question over and over..."Are you Scottish?" My reply being, "The only way I can be Scottish is if I marry into it....you offerin'????" :wink:

:wink: My dear sweet Mama (loves genealogy) traced back hundreds of years ago and found some poor soul distantly related to us (darn, no famous duke or earl) from Dingwall. Dingwall???? :confused:

Margaret- if I promise not to trace through my Heinz 57 ancestory with you, can I have one of those mogul mashers????

MacBubba
01-24-2005, 08:11 AM
"mogul masher?" The only mogul masher I ever had was (and is) permanently connected to the back side of my pelvis. They don't call them "sitzmarks" on the slopes for nothing :eek: . ("If you ain't falling down, you ain't having enough fun.")

Curt
01-24-2005, 08:38 AM
Well said Plaid Slacker.

Curt

Love2Drum
01-24-2005, 09:36 AM
Originally posted by ChickaDee:
It seems some people perceive only those with direct Scottish lineage would want to play bagpipes. When I first started learning, I heard that question over and over..."Are you Scottish?" My reply being, "The only way I can be Scottish is if I marry into it....you offerin'????" :wink:
I've run into that a lot. I'm always asked if I'm Scottish or where I'm from, and most seem dissappointed when I tell them I'm Italian and don't have a lick of Scots in me.

I'm involved in one of the Scottish clubs here and there's another gentleman who's Italian as well. We joke around about being the only 2 Italians in the group who married into a Scots family. At our Burns dinner this past Saturday he came up to me and asked me what my tartan was, and said he was wearing "Mac-Aroni". I thought that was hysterical!

phyx
01-24-2005, 09:48 AM
LMAO...that's awesome! :D :D

Tommy P.
01-24-2005, 10:29 AM
Originally posted by Jim Sloan:


I cut those conversations short by dropping,"my folks are from Northern Ireland".
The looks are classic.


Jim I like your style, Jim. :D

I think after a few seconds of listening to someones "family ties", I'd just tell them something like "I'm just an American of questionable heritage at best, who was told he had to wear this get-up if he wanted to play drums in the band.", and walk away.

phyx
01-24-2005, 10:33 AM
Originally posted by Rat Bast*rd:
I like your style, Jim.
I think after a few seconds of listening to someones "family ties", I'd just tell them something like "I'm just an American of questionable heritage at best, who was told he had to wear this get-up if he wanted to play drums in the band." That's a pretty good response if you ask me. I especially like the "questionable heritage at best" part. I think it would definitely force a smile on the person while letting them know that the conversation is going to end up nowhere if they keep it up. :)

Grant L
01-24-2005, 12:06 PM
If you haven't read it, "Highland Laddie Gone" by Sharon McCrumb is a very astute and amusing satire on the whole Brigadoonery scene, as well as a good murder mystery.
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/det...nce&s=books (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0345360362/qid=1106593143/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/104-5509482-1903108?v=glance&s=books)

Well worth a read, and well worth recommending to the next raconteur of family histories.

Grant
(whose Great-Grandmother was a Drummond-Hay)

Tommy P.
01-24-2005, 12:50 PM
:D I'll see if I can find my favorite Brigadoonery site and post it later. This computer's screwed up.


Tommy

(who's Great-Grandma was a Farmin-Ho)

Margaret
01-24-2005, 03:46 PM
Originally posted by ChickaDee:
Margaret- if I promise not to trace through my Heinz 57 ancestory with you, can I have one of those mogul mashers???? Of course you may have one!! I should explain that I am good listener and usually quite patient with those few folk who do ramble a bit when excited by the subject they're talking about. Unfortunately it's generally not some really cute guy who I'd be more than happy to stand and listen to all day (you know, looking like Tom Selleck, Sam Elliott, Paul Newman), but is a person (male or female) that it seems everyone else at the party has found a way to avoid, by either ducking behind the potted palm or waving at an invisible person across the room and dashing off. I, like the idiot I am, will stand and smile my vacuous smile and wonder if they'd be as interested in my Irish, Scottish and Welsh backround, with family that wasn't related to anyone famous, but did manage to survive being poor (a great accomplishment in itself given the times). :) At times I am tempted to make up some mythical and deranged family tree just to see the looks on their faces, but so far have refrained from doing so. The Campbell/MacDonald thing does get a bit old doesn't it, considering these folks just found out about it. I flatly refuse to tell people what my family tartan is when that all arises.

Margaret

Abdpiper
01-24-2005, 04:19 PM
I get asked if I'm German at least once in every trip I've made over there :shrug:

But the best one was when one of the guys at immigration asked what was in the my black case on my shoulder. When I said bagpipes he asked me if I was Scottish -- he was holding my passport!!!!!!!

There is great phrase that can be used on these people that bore you and that is "There are only 2 types of people in the World - those who are scottish and those who want to be" It means you need to tell them nothing about yourself and they usually stand there trying to work it out whilst you walk away....I've used that all over Europe :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Steve S.
01-24-2005, 10:21 PM
Come on over to El Paso where 90% of kids in Bel Air High School Pipe Band are Hispanic. Now that freaks some people out at Highland games.

Tommy P.
01-25-2005, 07:23 AM
"There are only 2 types of people in the World - those who are scottish and those who want to be" Judging from the opinions of a few members here, I think the phrase;

"There are only two types of people in the world, those who would do anything to be Scottish, and those who couldn't care less."

might be more appropriate. :wink:

JRM
01-25-2005, 08:15 AM
A line from one of my favourite songs:

"There's none more Scots than the Scot's abroad"

Too true

annefrommass
01-25-2005, 09:32 AM
Well said, Plaid Slacker. I agree with you wholeheartedly. I am proud of my heritage and am happy to talk about it with anyone who will listen :-D If someone has questions, I am happy to talk to them. I get lots of little kids coming up to me, since I am a tenor drummer, and my "sticks are really cool when I do that spinny thing." And I am happy to sit there and show them how it's done and answer questions about the guys in my band wearing "skirts" That may be the teacher in me though. Even if adults have questions, I am happy to talk. Its kind of the unwritten rule in our band that if someone asks a question while you are in uniform that you need to talk to them. i have NO problem doing that, and if I am busy or something with my daughter, I find someone else in the band who is willing to talk.
I love all things Scottish (except maybe haggis, but I will give it a go once in awhile) and can "talk shop" for hours. I have grown up with it, and sometimes find it hard to believe that not everyone shares the interest (drives my co-workers nuts).
But, that is just me. While i have the uniform on, I am representing my band, and if I were to be rude to someone or blow them off, it would reflect poorly on myself and on my band.

Bayoupiper
01-25-2005, 10:24 AM
Originally posted by Jim Sloan:


I cut those conversations short by dropping,"my folks are from Northern Ireland".
The looks are classic.
I started taking pleasure in doing this after the band got a letter of reprimand one year after someone in the local Scottish American Society complained we included an Irish set at a concert.

Jim [/QB]Oh yes! I am stealing that line to use!
I also see now that the "Irish" thing is nationwide.... :D


BP

Margaret
01-25-2005, 11:38 AM
Originally posted by Jim Sloan:
I started taking pleasure in doing this after the band got a letter of reprimand one year after someone in the local Scottish American Society complained we included an Irish set at a concert.

Jim Simply amazing that someone would be so incredibly, oh for want of a polite word, shortsighted these days? I guess that individual missed the whole culture thing, it's a good thing you didn't include any tunes from any Canadian or American pipers.....or did you <<GRAEMLIN_URL>>/shocked.gif ?

Even my "100%" Danish husband has an Irish great-gramma in his backround :D .

Margaret

Jim Sloan
01-25-2005, 03:04 PM
letter of reprimand one year after someone in the local Scottish American Society complained we included an Irish set at a concert.
---------------------------------------------
In retrospect he was probably being a snob and being the only one at the concert who could pick out a Scots tune from an Irish,just had to "harp" on it.
The highlight of the evening was a tune dedicated to an 87 year old Scotsman from Glasgow because it was his birthday.
A trio of us played "79ths Farewell To Gibralter" as he got up with his cane and his wife and paraded to the tune with more vigor than you could ever believe he could posess.
Taking the good with the bad!

Jim

Jimmy Ryan
01-25-2005, 03:19 PM
Originally posted by Rat Bast*rd:
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
<span style="font-weight: bold"> "There are only 2 types of people in the World - those who are scottish and those who want to be" </span></div></div>Anyone care to put a friendly wager on that...say $10,000?

Tommy P.
01-25-2005, 03:20 PM
Mis-quote. :D I never said that.

Marathon Piper
01-25-2005, 05:07 PM
Originally posted by Jimmy Ryan:
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Originally posted by Rat Bast*rd:
<span style="font-weight: bold"> <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
<span style="font-weight: bold"> "There are only 2 types of people in the World - those who are scottish and those who want to be" </span></div></div>Anyone care to put a friendly wager on that...say $10,000? </span></div></div>Are ya' jokin'???? :wow: That's real money!! We're Scottish, don't forget??!! :wink: :wink:

Tommy P.
01-25-2005, 09:42 PM
Again,...I never said that, and this probably ought to be moved to the beer tent.

MacBubba
01-25-2005, 10:55 PM
No, YOU neversaid[/B] that, but you quoted Abdpiper, who did say that, and your quote did not include his/her name.

See post 24 in this thread (last one on Page 1).

Gotcha! :wave:

Grant L
01-26-2005, 12:52 AM
Originally posted by Rat Bast*rd:
:D I'll see if I can find my favorite Brigadoonery site and post it later. This computer's screwed up.


Tommy
Was it this site:
http://www.durham.net/~neilmac/ ???

Grant

Tommy P.
01-26-2005, 07:20 AM
Grant...that's it!! I was at work where I could only access one site at a time, so I couldn't go there to retrieve the link!

That place is absolutely hilarious! :lol:

And I know what happened Cameron,..nanny-nanny-noo-noo :p
I just wanted to make sure ya'll knew I didn't make that statement. :)

I left the posters name off on purpose.

Margaret
01-26-2005, 08:45 AM
I'm bummed, the Brigadoonery site used to have (I swear) a whole bunch of tartan police pictures of offenders. Maybe the zillion complaints on their guestbook from people with no sense of humor finally got to them.

I kind of like this site too (warning: no Scottish content :) ) mobile dwelling choices (http://www.missouritrailertrash.com) . Again, in its original form, their guestbook had some very funny, very seriously horrified people......

Margaret

Matt Buckley_dup1
01-26-2005, 10:53 AM
I try to view these folks as a potential teaching opportunity. Invariably, talk will turn to the "banning of the pipes", the ancient links of clans and their tartans, the glory of Bonnie Prince Charlie, etc. This is your cue to politely start talking about the myth of the banning of the pipes, the real Charlie (you know, the one who ran from the field at Culloden and spent the next 40 years drinking away in Paris), and the creation of clan tartans in Victorian England. And once you're on a role, starting talking about the poetry and music of Hamish Henderson, the stories behind the great pibrochs, the sacrifice of the 51 Highland Division in World War II, etc. They'll either think you're daft, or they'll start paying attention. Either way, it's fine.

Reminds me of a wedding I did years ago. After playing the borderpipes, a woman in her 80s, native to Scotland, came up to me and announced, very loudly, "you, young man, are a fraud", claiming that she knew all about Scottish piping, and that there was no such thing as "borderpipes", and that no form of Scottish pipes had ever been played with bellows. I smiled, talked about borderpipes for a while, and then gave up.

Dave Sanderson
01-26-2005, 11:15 AM
I've learned not to argue with an idiot, they have had too much practise. Smile knowingly and move on.

Though I find this issue rarely happens to me, perhaps the demograpghics of Southern Ontario are fairly clued in these matters. What I do enjoy is at some events where elderly widows speak fondly of the memory of their late husbands war service and how the pipes remind them of when they were young.

Dave

Steven Giles
01-26-2005, 06:15 PM
from my own observations...mind you...i find that more likely than not, it is those people who are in question about their heritage who nag the heck out of everyone whom they think gives the slightest care. if you have nothing to prove, you have nothing to prove and generally do not keep running your gab about it. i really dont mind hearing how these people are all highland and stuff (most dare not be lowland)...it can be very humourous when you know the actual facts and they dont...most of the time i dont even bother to correct them, unless i loose my cool. good fun though. :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

Will pipe for Guinness
01-28-2005, 03:12 PM
okay, I guess I'm the odd person out. When I first joined the pipe band my first question was "so who's actually Scottish"? Yes, I see nothing wrong with that question and I'm CONSTANTLY amazed by how many people play the pipes who aren't even remotely close to being Irish or Scottish. So I kindly ask those folks why they started to play bagpipes and the most popular answer is "they looked like a challenging instrument and since I play everything else".
So I play pipes AND I'm one of those annoying people who walks up to other people and asks the heritage question.
I've had people who were visiting the area directly from Scotland who took offense to the fact that I called myself Scottish because I don't "live" in Scotland. As if where I lived determined my heritage.
I truly wish there were more Scottish people in my area because it would be cool to hang out with them (maybe at church or ceilidhs or whatever) but it seems there is a deplorable lack of them here.
So I wonder, where the heck are all of the Scottish people living if I can't find ANY in my area?
And yes, I always offer my clan name and location and spelling variation...since there's no contingent of my clan in this area I share this info proudly with....myself :lol:!

Bruce
01-28-2005, 04:06 PM
My Native American friends get the same thing. Anyone who has a drop of Indian blood goes on about how they are decended from some great war chief who married the beautiful princess on and on. And of course they are as white as can be. So we aren't the only folks who get to listen to the geneological disertation of some bore.

Brushpiper
02-04-2005, 11:06 AM
How refreshing to see you ladies speaking out on this phenomenon of claiming Scottish roots the instant they hear bagpipes, etc. Read James Webb's "Born Fighting", Scots-Irish (proper form BTW, "Scotch" is a whisky, Scots are a people) dealing with their influence on American history.

I tell them that I claim no clan, my lineage is a mish-mash of all sorts of wonderful folks (and a few ne'er-do-wells) thrown in. I enjoy what I'm doing and if you think this is the only form of bagpipes, you're sorely mistaken (see the Universe of Bagpipes website--excellent) but all with a smile of course...

Ron B.

Margaret
02-04-2005, 12:25 PM
I have a great great aunt, who, in a letter to my Grandmother in the 1940's, was very proud of the fact that we had no "fallen women" in the family - after finding the letter and sharing it with my family, my dad replied that some may have tripped, but not fallen :lol:

Margaret

MacLeodGirl
02-07-2005, 09:37 AM
Originally posted by ChickaDee:


My dear sweet Mama (loves genealogy) traced back hundreds of years ago and found some poor soul distantly related to us (darn, no famous duke or earl) from Dingwall. Dingwall???? :confused:

Hey!! I'm FROM Dingwall! It's not that unknown!
Gee, you almost make being Scottish out to be a bad thing...... :(

I'm totally not that bothered how annoyed people get with hearing about family heritage. If you are a piper/drummer obviously folk are going to ask about Scottish connections. So what?

However, I can understand how those who don't enjoy hearing about it can get bored. When I go to see my granny (on the Isle of Lewis), I constantly have to sit through hours of hearing who was who and when they got married and when they got divorced ( :eek: )and when they died and how many children they had. Part of the reason I hate it is because they all talk in gaelic and I don't understand half of it :rolleyes: .

From Sharon MACLEOD :bleh:

Mother: Elizabeth MACLeod (nee MAckenzie
Father: John Angus MACLeod
Granny (mum's side): Jane MACkenzie (nee MACleod)
Granny (dad's side): Margaret MACleod (nee MACkenzie)
Great-Granny (1/4): Anna MACKenzie (nee MACkay)
Great-Granny (2/4): Sheena MACLeod(nee MACIver)

etc
etc
etc
etc
etc

Want to know more??! Ach, just kidding.
:lol: :lol:

MacLeodGirl
02-07-2005, 09:45 AM
Ooooooooops. Ignore the "Ach" in my previous post. May sound too scottish. Sorry.
Didnae mean tae. :wink:

Hebrew Highlander
04-23-2005, 06:50 AM
Originally posted by MacLeodGirl:
Part of the reason I hate it is because they all talk in gaelic and I don't understand half of it :rolleyes: .
[/QB]Well, you might not see it that way, but I think it's totally and utterly COOL! Having relatives who can speak Gaelic, I can only wish I had too.. Yiddish is just not as cool... :(

So do you know a little Gaelic? I've read that it has become a mandatory subject for students in Scotland, is that true?
By the way, what does your signature mean?

Uri.

MacLeodGirl
04-23-2005, 09:35 AM
Well, i do speak a little gaelic but not well, although my parents, granny's and grandas all do. my dad's side of the family is from lewis (and skye, i think).

My signature line reads something like "he who speaks lowest hears best". (i can't seem to get the accents etc. all in)

Gaelic hasn't been made mandatory where i live - i don't think it ever will be - which is quite a shame really, although up in the highlands a lot of schools offer it t pupils. In my old primary school, I was in the gaelic unit for a few years - they taught the lessons in gaelic. Unfortunately, by doing that my english got pretty poor so I moved to normal english speaking classes - now my gaelic is poor!

Yeah, gaelic can be nice to listen to, although i have a 96 yr old great aunty (who lives in aberdeen) - she speaks gaelic with an aberdonian accent which annoys the hell out of my other gaelic-speaking relations. It's quite funny really, i think.

colin maclellan
04-23-2005, 11:33 AM
Originally posted by MacLeodGirl:
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Originally posted by ChickaDee:
<span style="font-weight: bold">

My dear sweet Mama (loves genealogy) traced back hundreds of years ago and found some poor soul distantly related to us (darn, no famous duke or earl) from Dingwall. Dingwall???? :confused:

Hey!! I'm FROM Dingwall! It's not that unknown!
</span></div></div>I'm from Dingwall as well!

KiltSwinger
04-23-2005, 09:52 PM
So one of my favourite stories, ok, one of my favourite :rolleyes: stories, is that, way back when, I was meeting my friend's parents.

In the course of conversation she mentioned I am from Scotland. Her father gets all excited ands says "OH REALLY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I'M SCOTTISH!!!!!!!!!!" Me, the wee innocent thing I am, says "oh, where from?"

He says " I don't know, we got here about 250 YEARS AGO!"

Even at 14, I knew not to say a word to burst this poor soul's bubble :lol:

Colonel644
04-24-2005, 08:09 AM
Originally posted by anne-QHPB:
Well said, Plaid Slacker. I agree with you wholeheartedly. I am proud of my heritage and am happy to talk about it with anyone who will listen :-D If someone has questions, I am happy to talk to them. I get lots of little kids coming up to me, since I am a tenor drummer, and my "sticks are really cool when I do that spinny thing." And I am happy to sit there and show them how it's done and answer questions about the guys in my band wearing "skirts" That may be the teacher in me though. Even if adults have questions, I am happy to talk. Its kind of the unwritten rule in our band that if someone asks a question while you are in uniform that you need to talk to them. i have NO problem doing that, and if I am busy or something with my daughter, I find someone else in the band who is willing to talk.
I love all things Scottish (except maybe haggis, but I will give it a go once in awhile) and can "talk shop" for hours. I have grown up with it, and sometimes find it hard to believe that not everyone shares the interest (drives my co-workers nuts).
But, that is just me. While i have the uniform on, I am representing my band, and if I were to be rude to someone or blow them off, it would reflect poorly on myself and on my band. Funny!! next time you get asked about twirly , stick, thang again , with the utmost sincerity look at them and say " we only do that when someone passes gas " and don't smile afterwards. I love the look on a person's face and believe it or not it's a 50/50 on people that believe it or know your joking.

No, that's me over there...
04-25-2005, 11:34 AM
You know... each of us is here because we are interested in some aspect of Scottish/Irish heritage...
Some are specifically interested in drumming or piping, and some are interested in a wider picture.
This does not mean that we can't intermix, as this forum shows, but the real trick, I think, is to be able to judge carefully each person's level of interest in what you are saying to them, and NOT trying to inflict your personal enthusiasm for some arcane Scottish trivia fact on anyone who is only interested in playing in a band.
This, in communications terms, is called "knowing your audience", and there are WAAAAAYYY too many people who let their mouth go before their brains are in gear, and end up spoiling others' enjoyment.
As a person who has been asked many, many times if I am related to a famous Scots "Fitba' playerrr" whos name I happen to share, and who personally knows little about the game and could care less, I know what this type of rabid enthusiam can be like!
... so there!
:lol: :lol:

MacBubba
04-25-2005, 12:12 PM
Originally posted by No-that's-me-over-there:
As a person who has been asked many, many times if I am related to a famous Scots "Fitba' playerrr" whos name I happen to share, and who personally knows little about the game and could care less, I know what this type of rabid enthusiam can be like!
... so there!
:lol: :lol:

--------------------
I understand the inventor of the bagpipes was inspired when he saw a man carrying an indignant, asthmatic pig under his arm. Unfortunately, the man-made object never equaled the purity of sound achieved by the pig.
-- Alfred Hitchcock

There's a famous Scottish Football player named Hitchcock? Wow! Who does he play for?

No, that's me over there...
04-25-2005, 01:13 PM
Yeah, he played and managed the Stirling Birds

Dave Gallagher
04-25-2005, 03:40 PM
It should be remembered that when most Americans or Canadians speak of being Irish or Scottish they are talking about their ancestry or ethnicity not their Nationality. Most of you that are of a great mix of ethnic groups do not understand those of us that are of 100 percent Irish or Scottish ancestry. I am proud to claim
"American Nationality" My family in Ireland thinks of me as Irish, just born farther away from home.
For years I lived with my step fathers name of Swoboda. Think of the questions I got about that.

Tommy P.
04-25-2005, 11:46 PM
Hmmmm,....
I wonder....do any of you know what Adam or Eve's last name was, 'cause being of "questionable heritage' at best, I was thinking that I'm pretty much 100% of what ever they were.
Lawdie, I hope they were Scottish or perhaps Irish. Then I'd too be bonified!

I gotta quit smoking this s**t. :humm:

No, that's me over there...
04-26-2005, 06:31 AM
My entire background -- ethnically -- is Scots. My upbringing is Canadian...
SO
Am I Scottish? Damn straight I am.
If a cat has kittens in a bakery does that make them currant buns? :D :D :D

Marathon Piper
04-26-2005, 02:33 PM
Originally posted by Tommy..:
Hmmmm,....
I wonder....do any of you know what Adam or Eve's last name was, 'cause being of "questionable heritage' at best, I was thinking that I'm pretty much 100% of what ever they were.
Lawdie, I hope they were Scottish or perhaps Irish. Then I'd too be bonified!

I gotta quit smoking this s**t. :humm: I'm with you Tommy!!!! :D :D

I'm a mud-blood Canuck and darn proud of it!!! :wink:

MP

brad
04-26-2005, 02:53 PM
Great point - we can all be traced back to Noah!!

Wasn't both the garden of eden and the area where Noah lived in the Iran/Iraq or Turkey area?
Does this make us all Turkeys?

Brad

MacBubba
04-26-2005, 03:19 PM
I thought I had some Scots blood, but then I found out my grandfather was -gasp- Adopted!

Now I feel like Dilbert's boss:

http://chemistry.uca.edu/identity_theft-Dilbert.gif

Now, before anybody gets offended, let me say that I have two adopted sons and I'm probably one of the biggest adoption advocates west of the Mississippi. You don't want to get me started on it.

No, that's me over there...
04-27-2005, 07:15 AM
Yeah, but we all wear kilts, so no underpants. What's yer point? :wink:

Tommy P.
04-27-2005, 09:34 PM
Originally posted by No-that's-me-over-there:
You know... each of us is here because we are interested in some aspect of Scottish/Irish heritage...
Wrong-a-rooskie! This stuff is nothing more than a good excuse to play some of the most difficult drum scores that ever existed on a snare drum.

And.....it is kinda' fun to get out of town for the weekend with friends, drink a lot of beer &amp; Scotch, and go "regi"!

No, that's me over there...
04-28-2005, 06:43 AM
Sorry, I thought playing Highland drumming -- as opposed to, say, Viennese waltzes -- qualified as "Scottish Heritage"
Agree with you about getting out &amp; about though!

Cpt MacLeod
04-28-2005, 10:20 AM
"...Nah, I'm from Wyoming," seems to end inquiries if that's what I want. Tag on, "...but most of my people are Scots," and the conversation most likely continues. I figure if I wear a kilt and play the pipes, I must have decided that I don't mind standing out a bit, having my picture taken with Bernice or Leslie, being character enough to draw conversation, having character enough to manage any ensuing exchange. Wearing the garb, playing the instrument, being nice to folks gets gigs, and is gentlemanly. QED.

EquusRacer
04-28-2005, 01:28 PM
Like many, especially when starting out on pipes or drums, I was wrapping the Scottish thing--or, as we say here, "the clanny thing"--into it a bit zealously. :rolleyes:

Then I discovered an ancestor who was hanged in Massachusetts colony in the 1600s. I thought that was way cool and forgot about all the other "roots" stuff. Or at least it had to have been a more interesting story. :woohoo:

CM
05-03-2005, 01:33 AM
Originally posted by EquusRacer:
Then I discovered an ancestor who was hanged in Massachusetts colony in the 1600s.EquusRacer,
Hopefully that wasn't on account of someone's piping ability.

380+ years... You just might be able to consider yourself a "local".

EquusRacer
05-03-2005, 08:21 AM
CM: You could well be right. Likely, it was a triple offence:

First, he probably walked into a group of Englishmen with pipes, thinking--erroneously--that this would be entertaining to them; second, the audience was a group of Puritans; third, he no doubt had to have pulled out a piobaireachd that he favored. Probably a celebration of some Scottish bashing of a group of Puritans some generations back.

Any of those three--and with all due respect to piobaireachd--can be hanging offenses. :wink:

Kwame Henderson
05-13-2005, 05:36 PM
Here in New Konigsberg Midwest, I get so many "Are you Scottish?" encounters that you'd think they'd never seen a pipe before. I'm looking into getting a custom-made flag to hang of my bass drone just for the purpose of dispelling those pawing folk. You vote on it: Kingdom-of-Prussia eagle? or Pomeranian griffin?

ThugPiper '72
05-13-2005, 09:30 PM
I get asked if I'm Irish. I have "SCOTLAND" tattooed across my knuckles. When they ask if I was born in Scotland, I say "No, I was born in Germany". Gets 'em everytime!

The Celebrated Mister Kite
05-15-2005, 08:38 PM
Mud blood yank over here.(Though mostly of Irish descent ie. IRISH &gt; 60%)

You know,I used to get aggravated when Americans referred to themselves as Irish/Scottish. I was horrified that an American would want to associate with being anything else.
But, I guess the older I get the less I care...Im sort of OK with it now. :wink:

K


Originally posted by Marathon Piper:
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Originally posted by Tommy..:
<span style="font-weight: bold"> Hmmmm,....
I wonder....do any of you know what Adam or Eve's last name was, 'cause being of "questionable heritage' at best, I was thinking that I'm pretty much 100% of what ever they were.
Lawdie, I hope they were Scottish or perhaps Irish. Then I'd too be bonified!

I gotta quit smoking this s**t. :humm: I'm with you Tommy!!!! :D :D

I'm a mud-blood Canuck and darn proud of it!!! :wink:

MP </span></div></div>

Joe Battle
05-16-2005, 08:05 AM
Then I discovered an ancestor who was hanged in Massachusetts colony in the 1600s CROWD: A witch! A witch! A witch! We've got a witch! A witch!
VILLAGER #1: We have found a witch, might we burn her?
CROWD: Burn her! Burn!
BEDEVERE: How do you know she is a witch?
VILLAGER #2: She looks like one.
BEDEVERE: Bring her forward.
WITCH: I'm not a witch. I'm not a witch.
BEDEVERE: But you are dressed as one.
WITCH: They dressed me up like this.
CROWD: No, we didn't -- no.
WITCH: And this isn't my nose, it's a false one.
BEDEVERE: Well?
VILLAGER #1: Well, we did do the nose.
BEDEVERE: The nose?
VILLAGER #1: And the hat -- but she is a witch!

1608: Francesco Maria Guazzo published the "Compendium Maleficarum." It discusses Witches' pacts with Satan, the magic that Witches use to harm others, etc.
circa 1609: A witch panic hit the Basque areas of Spain. La Suprema, the governing body of the Inquisition, recognized it as a hoax and issued an Edict of Silence which prohibited discussion of witchcraft. The panic quickly died down.
1610: Execution of Witches in the Netherlands ceased, probably because of Weyer's 1563 book.
1616: A second witch craze broke out in Vizcaya. Again an Edict of Silence was issued by the Inquisition. But the king overturned the Edict and 300 accused witches were burned alive.
1631: Friedrich Spee von Langenfield, a Jesuit priest, wrote "Cautio criminalis" (Circumspection in Criminal Cases). He condemned the witch hunts and persecution in Wurzburg, Germany. He wrote that the accused confessed only because they were the victims of sadistic tortures.
1684: The last accused Witch was executed in England.
1690's: Nearly 25 people died during the witch craze in Salem, MA: one was pressed to death with weights because he wouldn't enter a plea; some died in prison, the rest were hanged . 5 There were other trials and executions throughout New England.

rpeitzsch
05-16-2005, 08:35 AM
I am proud to say that one of my ancestors is Robert Calef who wrote "More Wonders of the Invisible World" (1700), a strong criticism of Coton Mather and his role in the witch trials (Mather wrote a book "Wonders of the Invisible World"). Due to Mather's strong influence, however, Calef had to send the book back to England to be printed.

Tommy P.
05-16-2005, 09:41 AM
According to recent research the "witches" were nothing more than normal townspeople suffering the effects of ergotism; caused by the consumption of rye that has been infected with the fungus ergot.

There are some great articles available on the subject of a young woman who, while in college in the 1970s, stumbled on a widely accepted explaination for the symptoms of the accused "witches".

Joe Battle
05-16-2005, 09:55 AM
Tommy, for a drummer :thumb:

Tommy P.
05-16-2005, 10:06 AM
Well,...sometimes I'd be better off keeping my mouth shut.

I knew I was posting that at the risk of my reputation. :wink:

Kenneth Tucker
05-16-2005, 10:10 AM
My father come over from Scotland with his parents and three brothers in the 20's. The parents and one brother went back about 15 years later. The brother who went back did a little genealogy in the 60's and wrote my father, "it seems we are descended from a long line of domestics and pastry cooks!" So much for royal blood.

Joe Battle
05-16-2005, 10:48 AM
Yar, I've been hearing folks a-sayin' "that Tom, do ya reckon he's got into some bad rye?"

And,
descended from a long line of domestics and pastry cooksI'd say you are much better off for it!!

Jan
05-16-2005, 11:02 AM
Just for grins and giggles I looked up ergotism and the Salem witch trials. No one knows what really went on. Since the first accuser confessed in later years that she made the thing up, I tend to think the incident started was started by some adolescent girls looking for attention. They got in too deep to get themselves out again without admitting they were responsible for what followed. But then who the heck am I to say what happened?

The following is a quote from historian Richard Trask, a leading authority on the Salem witch-hunt of 1692.

“… several researchers postulated that the afflicted ones were suffering from ergot poisoning from spoiled rye grain. Unfortunately, the symptoms, periods of fits, and information on the general population do not accord with classic ergot poisoning.
It is my opinion that a massive clinical hysteria had much to do with the witchcraft troubles.
New explanations often come about that reflect the particular time period of the theory’s origin. This theory became popular during the drug culture of the 1970s. “

Klondike Waldo
05-16-2005, 12:13 PM
Quote: 1690's: Nearly 25 people died during the witch craze in Salem, MA: one was pressed to death with weights because he wouldn't enter a plea; some died in prison, the rest were hanged . 5 There were other trials and executions throughout New England

1692 to be exact - same year as the Glencoe Massacre. Giles Corey was the one with the , umm pressing engagement. His last words were recorded as "more weight". The victims of tehe witch persecution were from Salem Village, now Peabody and Danvers, Massachusetts, not Salem proper. Part of the issue may have involved property, as the goods and farms of the convicted were confiscated and given to the "worthier" members of the town. Cotton Mather bade one of the victims to say the Lord's Prayer on the assumption that a soul posessed by Satan would not be able to do so. When the unfortunate person completed reciting the prayer, Mather declared it a trick and had the person promptly turned off anyway. ( Disclaimer- I grew up in Peabody, formerly South Danvers and earlier than that , Salem Village) so that was all local history for us. There are actual documents of the period in the Peabody Essex museum in Salem, MA BTW all of the accused (but one?) were eventuallly pardoned posthumously.

Tommy P.
05-16-2005, 12:41 PM
Fascinating subject, I'll be doing a little more reading.

:lol: I can't help but think we might be better off taking the discussion of witches somewhere other than the Ladies Room.

The Celebrated Mister Kite
05-16-2005, 05:03 PM
Hey, wait a minute!
Are you guys trying to say that they really werent witches!?

K

Blasphemy! :lol:

Originally posted by Rat Bast#rd:
According to recent research the "witches" were nothing more than normal townspeople suffering the effects of ergotism; caused by the consumption of rye that has been infected with the fungus ergot.

There are some great articles available on the subject of a young woman who, while in college in the 1970s, stumbled on a widely accepted explaination for the symptoms of the accused "witches".

Spunky
05-16-2005, 08:13 PM
Ah, but did they float? Like a duck? What else floats?

Michael New
05-17-2005, 12:10 AM
Bread!!!

DavidH
05-17-2005, 01:50 AM
Churches!!!!!

rpeitzsch
05-17-2005, 07:30 AM
Very small rocks!

Kevin Wiley
05-17-2005, 07:50 AM
Wood!!

Andrew F
05-17-2005, 08:03 AM
more witches!

rpeitzsch
05-17-2005, 08:19 AM
Boy, has this thread taken a couple of sharp turns from those "That God I'm Scottish Folk" to witches to Monty Python.... What's next?

JRM
05-17-2005, 08:27 AM
There once was a lad from East Lyme Connecticut
Whose father was oft heard to say just set and play a bit....

sorry Rob...just jumped into my head for some reason and I just had to say it.. :D

Want to add to or complete the limerick?

rpeitzsch
05-17-2005, 08:39 AM
Originally posted by Bobby:
There once was a lad from East Lyme Connecticut
Whose father was oft heard to say just set and play a bit....

sorry Rob...just jumped into my head for some reason and I just had to say it.. :D

Want to add to or complete the limerick? :D I better not, it is the Ladies' Room after all and we're supposed to behave ourselves here.

:wink:

Grant L
05-19-2005, 03:39 PM
"She turned me into a newt!"
"A newt?"
"I got better though."

Grant