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piob player
08-15-2005, 01:16 PM
Moving away from deep fried oreo cookies, does anybody know how to make porridge, preferably oatmeal porridge, like we can get in Britain?? I have tried steel cut oats but am probably not cooking them correctly. Any recipes?

Kevin
08-15-2005, 01:25 PM
For two servings:

2/3 cup of rolled oats or 1/2 cup of pinhead oats (steel-cut)

1-1/2 cups of cold water

3/8 teaspoon of salt

Bring water and salt to a boil. Add oats and stir well (preferrably with wooden spurtle).

Reduce heat to a low boil and cook until creamy. Cooking times will vary depending on the oats you use and are usually given on the package. Pour into bowls and let it set for a minute before serving.

Hope this helps,
Kevin

Dave Sanderson
08-15-2005, 01:31 PM
Not sure if this is the real way but this is how I do it.

1/2 cup quick oats
1 cup boiling water
sprinkle of brown sugar
couple table spoons of dark raisins
small measure of cream

Put oats in a bowel with the sugar and raisins then add the boiling water, cover and let sit for a couple of minutes til the mixture has absorbed the water. Add cream or whatever to suit, eat yumm.

I prefer this to the cooked stuff.

piper2b
08-15-2005, 01:59 PM
If you're using steel-cut oats (like McCann's) you might want to soak them the night before. It cuts down on the cooking time the next morning and might make it easier to get to the creamy porridge stage.

Nancy :wave:

AllisonB aka Sweet Reed
08-15-2005, 03:54 PM
I found this (http://www.mccanns.ie/pages/preparation.html) on the McCann's web page.

Someone (I think it was Tommy) told me the name of a company that makes really good oatmeal (supposedly Scottish style) but I can't remember the name of it. You could always e-mail him and ask.

I use plain old Quaker Oats but instead of water, I make mine with skim milk. Just never cared for the taste of oatmeal made with water. :shrug:

Tommy P.
08-15-2005, 05:59 PM
:D Here you go ladies:


Bob\'s Red Mill (Scottish Oats) (http://www.bobsredmill.com/catalog/index.php?action=showdetails&product_ID=344)

Here in the midwest, Albertson's carries it.

I highly recommend it,...you'll be throwing rocks at that George Washington looking "Quaker" guy! :lol:

Bruce Young
08-15-2005, 06:53 PM
Hey Piob Player. Having grown up in a household of two generations of scots, (in Lethbridge of all places), Quaker was the brand of the day. You can substitute milk or cream for the water but add more if you use whole milk or cream. My mom and granny always made it with water. I don't know if they were just frugal, from the poor side of the glen or just brought up that way. Once the porridge congealed in the bowl we would gently pour in the milk to float the mass and cover it with as much brown sugar as we thought we could get away with. Sticks to yer ribs.
bruce

Monkberrymoon
08-15-2005, 07:02 PM
FWIW, Scott's Porage Oats is quite good. But of course, it's owned by Quaker and, to my palate, they both taste the same. Which makes sense, when you think about it.

HotScot
08-16-2005, 08:06 AM
I float mine in milk with a generous shake of salt. No good Scot would put anything sweet on their porrage.

My husband had some interesting stuff in Stirling last year- they put whisky and cream on his porrage- he thought it was wonderful, I thought it was disgusting. Never seen that recipe before. :humm:

Rafe
08-16-2005, 08:51 AM
"Put oats in a bowel ..."
Well sure, eventually.

Kenneth Tucker
08-16-2005, 09:34 AM
Ingredients:1 cup oats, 3 cups water, salt, raisins, dash of cinnamon, grated nutmeg, cream, brown sugar,2 ozs single malt whisky.

Combine water, oats, salt, raisins, cinnamon and nutmeg. Bring to boil and simmer until creamy. Add cream and brown sugar. Drink whisky. Eat oatmeal.

sandpiper
08-16-2005, 03:32 PM
ughh. Sounds awful. I can't imagine putting whisky in oatmeal. I don't think it would be any different than putting kerosene in the oatmeal.

At our local natural foods store, there is an item called Scottish style porridge and right along side of it is another item called Irish style porridge. They're both made with oats so I wondered what the difference was beside the color of the labels.

Margaret
08-17-2005, 10:30 AM
You might try these folks, they're fabulous for yummy stuff! Their store/mill is just down the road from us, and impossible to leave without spending loads of $$$

http://www.bobsredmill.com/

Oh duh, I just read Tommy's post - obviously we have a lot more in common, horses, pipe bands, food......!

Margaret

legwyn
08-17-2005, 12:23 PM
Like you HotScot, my mum always salted her porridge. I like it either salty or sweet - depending on my mood.

When I know I won't have time in the morning, I make my porridge in the crock pot overnight using pinhead oats. For those of us in northern Michigan, we like to suggest dried cherries instead of raisins - they are great and really good for you too.

Do a search on www.foodnetwork.com (http://www.foodnetwork.com) for several overnight recipes. Alton Brown's episode on oats was funny and informative.

What I need is a spurtle. Anyone have suggestions for a good source?

Happy eating! Lee

AllisonB aka Sweet Reed
08-17-2005, 04:19 PM
Originally posted by Kenneth Tucker:
Ingredients:1 cup oats, 3 cups water, salt, raisins, dash of cinnamon, grated nutmeg, cream, brown sugar,2 ozs single malt whisky.

Combine water, oats, salt, raisins, cinnamon and nutmeg. Bring to boil and simmer until creamy. Add cream and brown sugar. Drink whisky. Eat oatmeal. Yummmmm! I do believe I'm going to try that tomorrow morning! :eek:

Thanks for the link Tommy (and Margaret) :D I do believe I'm gonna order me summa them thar oats. :D Oh...and I like to put a dash of salt in while the oats are cooking but then add Splenda afterwards. The salt really enhances the flavor of the oatmeal.

AllisonB aka Sweet Reed
08-17-2005, 04:27 PM
Hmmmm...I just saw "Triticale" listed on Bob's Red Mill site. Isn't that what the tribbles ate till they died? :shrug: If I had to make a wild guess I'd say it is a flat wooden spoon/spatula for stirring oatmeal. Anyone care to enlighten me?


Ah ha!! Found one!! Spurtle (http://www.sunrisewoodcrafts.ns.ca/spurtles.html)

Bill Adam
08-17-2005, 05:24 PM
A friend of mine was visiting Scotland last year and brought me a spurtle. She said that some legends say the carried the spurtle in their hose along with the skein dubh.

In doing a search for information on the spurtle, I also came across a porridge cooking contest with the winner receiving the "Golden Spurtle Award"

Bill

piper2b
08-17-2005, 06:59 PM
My favorite oatmeal breakfast (except for the wickedly fattening Creme Brulee Oatmeal with Orange/Vanilla flavoring by Caprial, that is):

Bob's Red Mill Oats cooked with a touch of sea salt, just enough water, microwaved for 1min30sec.
Add toasted pecans, dried cherries or dried cranberries with cherry flavoring, and add milk 'til oatmeal is the desired consistency.
YUM!!! Where's the tummy-rubbing Graemlin???
:thumb:

Nancy

No, that's me over there...
08-18-2005, 05:05 AM
Either Whisky or Drambuie on top! The nutmeg-like taste and sweetness of the Drambuie would be my preference. Save the single malt to wash it down after~!

RosieJ
08-19-2005, 10:19 AM
Originally posted by AllisonB aka Sweet Reed:
Hmmmm...I just saw "Triticale" listed on Bob's Red Mill site. Isn't that what the tribbles ate till they died? :humm:

Nope, they were eating "QUADRO-triticale"! Don't know how I remember that.........guess I've watched "Trouble with Tribbles" too many times! Actually, though, triticale means wheat if I'm not mistaken, so the Star Trek folks were trying to be accurate.

And is the spurtle round, kind of like a pestle, so the oats get a bit mashed up while you're stirring them? It just seems that it wouldn't move the stuff you're stirring around as well as a spoon would, it would get more mashed around the sides of the pot.

Richard Hallyburton
08-19-2005, 12:20 PM
A spurtle is really just a stick. It's a bit like a wooden spoon, but without the spoon bit! It tends to be a little thicker than a wooden spoon handle though, and often has a thistle carved on top. The point of the spurtle is to stir the porridge enough so that it doesn't burn on the bottom of the pan, but also doesn't 'tear' the porridge like a wooden spoon will. You don't need to mash the oats, they will happily disintegrate all by themselves once a critical point in the cooking is reached.

My great aunt used to cook me porridge made from salt, which I didn't like. I make mine with oats, water and light brown sugar. I'm going to try it with salt again soon to see if my tastes have changed.

Another thing my great aunt told me is that you must only ever stir the porridge anticlockwise with the spurtle. She was quite adamant about this. Has anyone else ever heard of this tradition?

P.S. Does anyone know where I can buy a spurtle in Aberdeen? Just now I'm using the handle of a wooden spoon...

Richard Hallyburton
08-19-2005, 03:38 PM
Er, did I say anticlockwise? I meant clockwise.

Also, I just tried it with salt for the first time in a long time. I put in a little too much, and whilst it's edible enough, given the choice I'll stick to sugar :thumb:

the fishiologist
08-19-2005, 05:49 PM
Try this page:
World Porridge Making Championship (http://www.goldenspurtle.com/)
Some good recipes for traditional porridge, as well as some yummy looking ones for not-so-traditional recipes. All held in Scotland, of course! :)

piper2b
08-19-2005, 07:02 PM
Another thing my great aunt told me is that you must only ever stir the porridge anticlockwise with the spurtle. She was quite adamant about this. Has anyone else ever heard of this tradition? Maybe she was a fan of George Burns and his wife Gracie's TV show. (OK, this will DEFINITELY tell how old I am . . .) Gracie is stirring a bowl of batter and wants to answer the door, so she hands it to George. He promptly begins stirring in the other direction and she stops him, saying "No, don't go that way, you'll unwind it!" :lol:

Or, maybe you just had to be there . . . :)

Nancy

John McCann
08-21-2005, 12:25 PM
I can't claim any links with McCann Irish oatmeal but here's how we do it in Fife Scotland. 1 cup oatmeal to 1 cup milk and 1 cup water also a good pinch of salt. Bring to the boil and simmer for 4 minutes (for rolled oats, cut oats :thumb: need a fair bit longer or an overnight soak) Never I repeat never ever put sugar in. It doesn't have to taste like crap to be real Scottish porridge but using sugar is just down right English. You have been warned. Thank you. Hope this helps.

Richard Hallyburton
08-21-2005, 04:07 PM
Steady on John, there's no need to hit me with such a serious, nay heinous, and just downright offensive insult! :eek:

I've just got a very sweet tooth, OK? :banana:

Dave Sanderson
08-21-2005, 05:01 PM
Ok, since folks are now "beating to quarters" I occasionally put in a dollop of maple syrup on the top and swirl it in, very Canadian.

Tommy P.
08-21-2005, 05:36 PM
Put me down for sugar, butter, and cream.

And sometimes molasses!

AllisonB aka Sweet Reed
08-22-2005, 07:46 AM
</font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by John McCann:
<strong> I can't claim any links with McCann Irish oatmeal but here's how we do it in Fife Scotland. 1 cup oatmeal to 1 cup milk and 1 cup water also a good pinch of salt. Bring to the boil and simmer for 4 minutes (for rolled oats, cut oats :shrug: Most tips and recipes I've read say to just add water and leave on the stove overnight to soak. I ordered some steel cut oats from Red Mill and need all the cooking tips I can get!

PS Love the reeds! :thumb:

Kathy Rae
08-22-2005, 08:15 AM
My daughter had a "special" oatmeal breakfast at her first Spark camp a couple of years ago. They made oatmeal and put ICE CREAM on top! Even my son will eat that!

Cheers,
Kathy

Colonel644
08-22-2005, 08:54 AM
Originally posted by AllisonB aka Sweet Reed:
Anyone care to enlighten me?


Ah ha!! Found one!! Spurtle (http://www.sunrisewoodcrafts.ns.ca/spurtles.html) I'd call that a truncheon or nightstick Allison!!!

AllisonB aka Sweet Reed
08-22-2005, 10:52 AM
Originally posted by Colonel644:
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Originally posted by AllisonB aka Sweet Reed:
<span style="font-weight: bold"> Anyone care to enlighten me?


Ah ha!! Found one!! Spurtle (http://www.sunrisewoodcrafts.ns.ca/spurtles.html) I'd call that a truncheon or nightstick Allison!!! </span></div></div>Yah well...ya know those Scottish woments gotta keep their ments in line somehow. :p :wink:

John McCann
08-22-2005, 04:39 PM
For Sweet Reed.
A cold soak in the refrigerator is fine. I guess the stove top method just dates back to pre refrigerator days that's all. I hope nobody takes offence at my wee leg pull about the English. I like to preserve as much genuine tradition as possible, it's a shame that modern Scottish kids know so little about our history and tradition. I make a point of telling my kids as many stories and facts as they can stand to bear. (mostly they enjoy it)
Ok, while I'm here I may as well give you another wee insight to a lost way of living.

Oatmeal played a very important part in the Scottish staple diet. Not so long ago working men preparing the next days packed lunch would take the best drawer from the kitchen table, scrub it clean then pour in a thick porridge mix and leave it overnight. Next morning they would cut a slice from the drawer to take with them.

That's it for today. I may post some more wee bits if anybody is interested.

Tommy P.
08-22-2005, 06:12 PM
Mmmmmm,..biting my tongue! :eek:

AllisonB aka Sweet Reed
08-22-2005, 06:18 PM
I hope nobody takes offence at my wee leg pull about the English Well, I thought it was funny even though I do put sweetener on my oatmeal. However I can't speak for the much maligned English. :eek: :bleh: but I do think it is a neat bit of history to pass on to one's children.

Someone posted their recipe for porridge that included raisins, cinnamon and nutmeg. I tried it and it was delicious! And yesterday (somewhere, don't remember where) I either read or heard that people who eat 1/4 teaspoon (or was that 1/2 :confused: ) of cinnamon every day have less chance of developing cancer. Soooo, have a bowl of oatmeal every day with cinnamon on it! Lower your cholesterol and ward off cancer all while having a delicious, traditional Scottish meal. :thumb:

beewings
08-22-2005, 08:30 PM
If you live where you can get it, Snoqualmie Falls oatmeal is wonderful. Can't get it here in Georgia, but it's great slow-cooked oatmeal. I like mine with half-and-half, brown sugar, and raisins. :)

beewings

Fuzzymoose
08-24-2005, 01:56 PM
Haven't really tried these recipes myself, nor can I vouch for authenticity, but here's a link to Alton Brown's "Good Eats" episode on oats.
I've been meaning to try the "overnight oats" cooked in a crock pot...

http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/Season5/EA1E06.htm

Kathy Rae
08-25-2005, 06:21 PM
Piob Player... I just noticed you were from Calgary same as me! You could try the Rogers Old-fashioned Large Flake Oats for your porridge. You can buy them at Co-op. My husband likes them much better than the Quaker Oats brand.
Cheers,
Kathy