Bob Dunsire Bagpipe Forums

Bob Dunsire Bagpipe Forums (http://forums.bobdunsire.com/forums/index.php)
-   Music (http://forums.bobdunsire.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=353)
-   -   Name for style of pipe music (http://forums.bobdunsire.com/forums/showthread.php?t=166587)

Anndrah 06-03-2018 06:18 PM

Name for style of pipe music
 
I have been wracking my brain to think of a word. It basically describes pipe music that has a distinct sound that includes lots of slurs, vibrates, and lots of g grace notes. Very similar to the style of music played on uilleann pipes. I heard the word a fair bit back in the 90s and early 2000s, but haven't heard it recently. Might be because I have been away from pub playing, and tend toward traditional on my own, or it might have just been a local bastardization.

anybody have any ideas?

Thanks,

el gaitero 06-03-2018 08:16 PM

Re: Name for style of pipe music
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Anndrah (Post 1327818)
I have been wracking my brain to think of a word. It basically describes pipe music that has a distinct sound that includes lots of slurs, vibrates, and lots of g grace notes. Very similar to the style of music played on uilleann pipes. I heard the word a fair bit back in the 90s and early 2000s, but haven't heard it recently. Might be because I have been away from pub playing, and tend toward traditional on my own, or it might have just been a local bastardization.

anybody have any ideas?

Thanks,

.....jazz?

Anndrah 06-03-2018 09:59 PM

Re: Name for style of pipe music
 
* vibrato not vibrates.

No, not jazz...

Chris Knife 06-04-2018 03:35 AM

Re: Name for style of pipe music
 
"Kitchen Music?"

pancelticpiper 06-04-2018 04:57 AM

Re: Name for style of pipe music
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Anndrah (Post 1327818)
pipe music that has a distinct sound that includes lots of slurs, vibrato... Very similar to the style of music played on uilleann pipes.

You're describing what the rest of the bagpipe world calls "bagpipe music".

Because if you listen to uilleann pipe music, French (not Breton) pipe music, Bulgarian pipe music, and many other styles, pipers bend notes and use vibrato.

Why this became verboten in Highland pipe music is one of those mysteries. Especially since when piobaireachd is sung I've heard those things- bending notes and vibrato. When the same player plays the same tune on the pipes those things are left out. Why? I've heard the theory that it's the influence on Highland piping of the harp, which plays pure tones.

Anyhow Highland pipers can use any term they want, kitchenpiping or what have you, but it's simply Highland pipers playing like other pipers, like piobaireachd is sung.

Since I play uilleann pipes, on which vibrato and note-bending is something you do whenever the whim strikes you, I find it amusing when Highland pipers make a big deal out of them. I've heard note-bending described as a special technique that's only done on one note on one tune! (I can't remember the title of the tune offhand, a pipe band played it bending from Low G up to Low A and all the Highland pipers acted like the world was ending.)

Or another tune, Pumpkin something, where every time a certain note happens they do a huge blatant bend on it, like it's a special property of that note. On other bagpipes note-bending is more subtle and an essential technique that's used on every tune, anywhere you feel like using it.

Klondike Waldo 06-04-2018 05:58 AM

Re: Name for style of pipe music
 
I have an idea… Let's call it "Expressive":woot:

HighlandPark 06-04-2018 09:23 AM

Re: Name for style of pipe music
 
Like Richard, I come from a trad background playing other instruments where bending notes is the norm. While there is certainly a place for the very traditional form of Highland Piping, why slurs and other 'embellishment's are not used more with this instrument is surprising.

IMHO, Terry Tully is one of the foremost pipers employing 'slurs' in his compositions (e.g., Pumpkin's Fancy) and playing/arranging (e.g., Eagle's Whistle). Stuart Liddell does his fare share of note-bending, and there are others. If it's good enough for them...

Dan Bell 06-04-2018 11:35 AM

Re: Name for style of pipe music
 
[QUOTE=pancelticpiper;1327844
Why this became verboten in Highland pipe music is one of those mysteries. Especially since when piobaireachd is sung I've heard those things- bending notes and vibrato. When the same player plays the same tune on the pipes those things are left out. Why? I've heard the theory that it's the influence on Highland piping of the harp, which plays pure tones..[/QUOTE]

I wonder if the military's standardization of playing styles contributed to this. Ditto with the use of natural notes. I hate it when people refer to those as "false fingerings." There's nothing false about them; they are simply notes whose use seems to be out of favor in the competition highland piping milieu. There's plenty of worthy repertoire that uses them.

TwitchyFingers 06-04-2018 04:42 PM

Re: Name for style of pipe music
 
Kitchen piping?
A man I knew, who could be a bit stodgy at times, called it "Tinker Piping", as a pejorative on Ireland's tinker culture, but with a nod to a freer open style.

pancelticpiper 06-04-2018 05:35 PM

Re: Name for style of pipe music
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by HighlandPark (Post 1327857)
Terry Tully is one of the foremost pipers employing 'slurs' in his compositions...

That's exactly what I was talking about. In most genres of piping all the pipers put note-bending in any tune composed by anybody whenever the whim strikes. It's the not the special provenance of any particular composer or any particular tune.

The whole idea that a particular tune has note-bending, and other tunes do not, is utterly alien to pretty much all piping traditions except for the modern Highland one.


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:06 AM.