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Go Back   Bob Dunsire Bagpipe Forums > General Discussion > History, Tradition, Heritage
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History, Tradition, Heritage As related to the subjects of piping, drumming and pipe bands.

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Old 12-13-2012, 01:04 AM   #41
Neil Clark
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Default Re: Etiquette and Traditions...

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Originally Posted by sonofsomerled View Post
Agreed - Its more Victorian nonsense, probably to remind you that the judge is gentry (and you ain't). .

Thats exactly what saluting IS. Except it goes a little further than that. Entering the Lords presence, you were required to show u didnt bear arms, and an empty right hand raised to the head was ok. Soon developed into a custom.

I prefer the Archers' salute. French used to cut archers index and middle fingers off if they caught them. Standing from afar, an intact archer would pay his respects by raising said fingers and wiggling them at the enemy.

Oh, please don't use that one. It may affect your sheet.

Incidentally, I DO salute. Doesnt make any difference, but I can't help myself. Maybe, depending on performance, you could use standard salute on approach, and Archers' on retiral. Or even salute the crowd..
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Old 12-13-2012, 03:17 AM   #42
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Default Re: Etiquette and Traditions...

As for saluting at competitions... I just give a nod and a "Thank You, Sir/Mam!" Seems to go over fine... Whatever you do, just be respectful and well-mannered! (Don't stomp off the boards after a bad performance, etc.)
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Old 12-14-2012, 10:36 AM   #43
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Default Re: Etiquette and Traditions...

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Originally Posted by Neil Clark View Post
Thats exactly what saluting IS. Except it goes a little further than that. Entering the Lords presence, you were required to show u didnt bear arms, and an empty right hand raised to the head was ok. Soon developed into a custom.
Neil - that's interesting, is this a custom that goes waaay back, as in Romans, Greeks, Egyptians, etc.? They all had a form of hand/arm salute. I realize I am straying a bit off the boards here but can't resist running down an historic tidbit like this.
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Old 12-14-2012, 10:43 AM   #44
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Default Re: Etiquette and Traditions...

Actually, it goes back further than that, and it had nothing to do with lords and such. It was a greeting between freemen, the purpose of which was to show that each were unarmed. There is nothing subservient about a salute - it has evolved to a greeting between warriors (defined however you want to ).
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Old 12-14-2012, 03:37 PM   #45
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Default Re: Etiquette and Traditions...

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Actually, it goes back further than that, and it had nothing to do with lords and such. It was a greeting between freemen, the purpose of which was to show that each were unarmed. There is nothing subservient about a salute - it has evolved to a greeting between warriors (defined however you want to ).
I understand the handshake served a similar purpose.... still us lefties were still ahead on that game
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Old 12-14-2012, 04:54 PM   #46
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Default Re: Etiquette and Traditions...

Even though I'm a civilain, when the CO walked into the room the other night I snapped to my feet along with the RSM. Courtesy goes a long way with the troops who are still "kicking sand out of their boots". Mess diner tomorrow night; polish, shine, press.
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Old 12-15-2012, 02:33 AM   #47
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Default Re: Etiquette and Traditions...

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Actually, it goes back further than that, and it had nothing to do with lords and such. It was a greeting between freemen, the purpose of which was to show that each were unarmed. There is nothing subservient about a salute - it has evolved to a greeting between warriors (defined however you want to ).

I'll take that on board. However, the point of the salute in the British/commonwealth forces is to acknowlege the Queens Commision. It is certainly subservient, but also certainly a mark of respect.

Even the term "freemen" shows someone who is not bound by servitude to a feudal Lord. In other words, a guy who is pretty well off.

"nothing to do with Lords and such" Mr Medic, do you normally converse in that "tone"? Nothing here is provenanced as documented fact, including my own ramblings.

Have a salute!
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Old 12-15-2012, 05:00 AM   #48
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Default Re: Etiquette and Traditions...

I suspect that "saluting" in general has certain universal aspects, given that people of all nations and cultures tend, as a rule, to be upright bipeds (at least up to the third Guinness), with dual brachial extensions culminating in a five-fingered hand.

I doubt the Eurocentric origins apply everywhere, especially since ancient societies had salutes long before there was a Europe.

European hand-salutes is a more narrow branch of this topic, and probably not of universal application.

Many nations that only modernized their armed forces in the late 19th or early 20th century or later, have clearly imitated European custom to a great extent. (Like the three stripes on the British sailors' collar (originally a kerchief), but also seen in China and Russia and Japan and France and elsewhere.)
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Old 12-15-2012, 08:19 AM   #49
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Default Re: Etiquette and Traditions...

I remember reading ( though I can't remember where) that the British-style military salute evolved from Knights raising the visors on their helmets as a sign of respect to their liege lords/soverign,etc.

That would perhaps explain the palm-outwards motion, unlike the "knife-hand" US military salute.


But I think we're pretty far removed from piping related at this point...
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Old 12-16-2012, 04:44 AM   #50
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Default Re: Etiquette and Traditions...

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At Arlington National Cemetery, the piper waits until the end.
Interestingly, the incident I mentioned happened while I was at Arlington National Military Cemetery... the one in Riverside California.

My Father-in-Law, who was an Infantry Officer in WWII, was buried there, and I was honoured to pipe for him.
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