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Old 11-07-2016, 04:45 AM   #1
JonThePipes
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Default Fully mounted vs half mounted NSP

I am looking for some NSPs and have come across the terminology: "Fully mounted" and "half mounted"

Can someone explain what this is, the difference between the two, and advantages or disadvantages of each setup?

Many thanks
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Old 11-07-2016, 07:09 AM   #2
Rob_Say
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Default Re: Fully mounted vs half mounted NSP

It's not a precisely defined term in the NSP world - however there are generally accepted principles you can apply. Each maker will have their own view as to what a fully decorated means .. and some probably differ from this list, but that's perfectly normal and OK.
  • 'Unmounted' - this would imply no extra metalwork on the drones beyond that which is absolutely necessary to hold the thing together. So all you have is the long metal tube of the slider ... and that's it, everything else is simple undecorated wood - with the possible exception of the drone cap which would be horn, plastic or another material. An unmounted set would only have one tuning bead on the G drone and would not have piston drone stops. You only see this on historical sets, simple sets or deliberate 'undecorated' sets' (and they can still be beautiful!)
  • 'Half-mounted' - this is the grey area. On the one hand it implies more functional bits of metalwork and on the other it may be decoration on the existing parts.
    • may or may not have additional metalwork on the standing parts of the drones
    • tuning beads on one or more drones, unpinned or unguided channel
    • tuning beads may be metal *or* complimentary material
    • piston drone stops (unless explicitly designed as open ended drones)
    • metal drone end ferrules below a complementing cap - may not be full length
    • minimally decorated ferules (unless explicitly designed without decoration)
  • 'Fully Mounted' - this implies an extra level of decoration and artistry in the construction of the drones. The full Reid pattern is a very common basis.
    • ferrules at both ends of standing part + complementary capping
    • tuning beads to all drones, may have two on the G drone, guided pins
    • full length drone end ferrules from cap to tuning bead (or some other artistic presentation of the tuning beads)
    • common decoration to all metal parts
    • complementary decoration to all wooden parts (including stocks)
Personally I would expect a 'fully mounted' set to have lined drone sliders as well (metal wrapped wood tube sliding on wood).

The majority of Burleigh pipes would be considered somewhere between 'Unmounted' and 'Half mounted' (e.g. http://milecastle27.co.uk/rob/2014/0...eigh-7k-nsp-f/ note the minimal metalwork, absent on the standing parts, drone end metalwork is minimum for structural integrity - but it has some decoration to metalwork and standing parts.)

The vast majority of Colin Ross pipes would be 'Fully Mounted' (e.g. http://theotherpipers.org/index/?p=367 note the double ended metalwork & caps on standing part, decorated wood - wood & metal decoration is consistent to all parts.)

cheers

Rob

Last edited by Rob_Say; 11-07-2016 at 07:21 AM. Reason: formatting
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Old 11-07-2016, 07:28 AM   #3
Rob_Say
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Default Re: Fully mounted vs half mounted NSP

Part 2: Advantages & Disadvantages
  • Unmounted - simple, unfussy, generally cheaper ... but also potentially less robust
  • Half-mounted - 'normal' - a set of drones that will last longer than you. Every piece is primarily designed for function. Economically more sensible to make as form is based on easy of construction.
  • Fully-mounted - aesthetically more pleasing, marginally easier to tune each drone, easier to use tuning beads. Should last longer than your grandchildren as all wood is protected from splitting & damage.
R
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Old 11-07-2016, 08:26 AM   #4
JonThePipes
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Default Re: Fully mounted vs half mounted NSP

Thank you Rob, that is very clear
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Old 11-07-2016, 12:14 PM   #5
longwind
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Default Re: Fully mounted vs half mounted NSP

Thanks so much Rob! Now I know what I have.
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