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Old 05-03-2018, 08:09 PM   #1
Michael Kazmierski Dunn
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Default Zampogna: The Forastiero Brothers

Hey pipers,
Ok, so first of all, I don't own a set of Italian Zampogna pipes, but ever since 2010 I've been really hooked on the tonal qualities produced by the Zampognas made by Vincenzo and Antonio Forastiero, who are both sadly deceased now. There's this film that I really am interested in about the brothers' pipemaking careers, and it also comes with a CD. Have you ever seen this Zampogna film? I think you can buy it from their website and it comes with a CD of the Forastiero brothers playing. Though I'm afraid if I buy it won't be too useful as I don't speak Italian... and I think it's too bad the CD isn't on ITunes, because my favorite track of which I only have a sample, "La Castellana", is superb. Is it possible anybody might own a copy? What about the CD?
http://www.azulfilm.com/practice-and-mastery/
And here's the research I've gathered, using my knowledge from Google Translator on the sites, about their pipemaking.
Three of the best modern makers - Quirino Valvano, Amedeo Cannazzaro and Carmine Dante - were trained in pipemaking from the late, legendary Zampogna makers Antonio Forastiero (born 1929) and his brother Vincenzo (1919), both of whom lived in Lauria, in the province of Potenza in Basilicata, near Naples. The older of the brothers, Vincenzo, was the first of them who learned to make Zampognas starting in the 1940s under the tutorage of Carmine Trimarco together with his son Vito (born 1882 and 1921 respectively) both from Polla. About a decade later, the younger brother Antonio got his head in the game, where he apprenticed primarily under Vito as Carmine was suffering from ill health and old age. Unlike most Highland pipe companies who worked with perhaps a number of them and got influences large or small from each of them, the Forastieros only learned from the father and son of the one family. As the Trimarco family was not very famous in the pipemaking world, that is rarely mentioned or heard of, however, despite making the best Zampognas of their time, we have little or no evidence from whose pipes from which their instruments were copied. Having said that, most Zampogna experts suggest that Carmine's father made the extraordinary Zampognas before Carmine and Vito. In fact, most Zampogna makers, and certainly not least some players, are generationally based (carried from father to son through the centuries, think Pino Salamone and his father), so it wouldn't be surprising to learn that Carmine Trimarco's father taught him to become a pipemaker, then passed down to his son Vito. Despite their training under a largely unheard-of brand, oddly, the Forastieros became one of the most famous Zampogna pipemaking firms of their age, and in fact several old Forastiero sets still remain in excellent condition and still being played, just as several old sets of Highland pipes still work. Obviously, given their apprenticeship, the Forastiero sets are based on an old yet fine Trimarco set, formerly owned by the older of the two brothers, both of whom are sadly deceased but importantly will be long remembered.
In Highland piping, if instruments of the Henderson brand are often considered the best tonally speaking, especially those made by John MacDougall Gillies from 1908-1925, a Zampogna made by either the Forastiero Brothers or the Trimarcos would equate to an old Henderson set. Likewise, not to be outdone among modern instruments, of course, a set by Quirino Valvano is like the Henderson sets made by Alastair Dunn, or a Heritage set by Charlie Kron.
In terms of tone, many of the modern Zampogna Achiavi sets, such as those made by Carmine Carbone, Vito Leo, Marco Tomassi, Marco Cignini, Ricci, Mofa or Citera compare to an average-sounding set in the Highland pipe world - not tonally the super best, but nevertheless very popular, if not overrated. As stated before, as Hendersons both old and new are known for their overly extraordinary tone, so are the Trimarco and the Forastiero Bros pipes (not to mention those made by Valvano, of course, along with five others - Salamone / Totarella, LeRose, Mazziotti / St. Cecilia, Cannazaro and Dante, of course). Particularly, the somewhat stronger bass chanter (as opposed to the soprano chanter), especially in combination with the harmonics of the tonic Doh note, are a few things that set a Trimarco or Forastiero apart from the majority of old Achiavi Zampognas. Among modern makes, these same characteristics also make either a Valvano, Cannazzaro, LeRose, St. Cecilia, Totarella or Dante set stand out from the crowd. Harmonically speaking, the Doh note of the bass chanters made by most of the modern Zampogna firms have strong harmonics #4 and 5, sometimes with a strong harmonic #3. Regarding notes, harmonic 3 is the same note as the Sol on the soprano chanter, harmonic 4 is an octave above the soprano's Doh, and harmonic 5 is an octave above the soprano's Mi. A disadvantage of having a strong harmonic 5 (upper Mi), is because if you choose to play in a minor key - as used exclusively in Monreale - the combination of the Meh note of the soprano chanter together with the harmonic 5 of the Doh of the bass chanter resonating on Mi, is dissonant (that is, even when the notes are in tune, they tend to sound like they're fighting or clashing with each other). An average Zampogna player may not be aware of this, however, just as how most Highland pipers take for granted the slightly mediocre tone of not-the-bestmade Highland pipe compared to a Henderson. The upper Mi harmonic (harmonic 5) is presumably due to the fact that the bell of the bass chanter has four vent-holes on the sides, similar to the two vent-holes at the bottom of Highland pipe chanters. Contrastingly, a Zampogna made by one of the eight fantastic manufacturers modern or historic - Valvano, St. Cecilia, LeRose, Cannazzaro, Totarella, Dante, Forastiero and Trimarco - have bass chanters with a Doh that is harmonically quite pleasing. Harmonic 4 (upper Doh) is one of the loudest harmonics, with harmonic 3 (soprano Sol) being the second-loudest; best of all, there is very little if any harmonic 5 (upper Mi). This gives the pipes no dissonance if you play in major or minor due to the lack of the upper Mi harmonic, harmonic 5. In addition, when playing both Doh's on both chanters, it will sound like a G-D-G chord, rather than a full G-major chord despite there being no actual Mi note being played, which most of the other Zampogna builders sadly produce. The unique set of harmonics produced by the Doh of the bass chanter of a set of pipes made by these companies is due to the bell only having two vent-holes instead of four.
Also, a track by the two brothers appears on track 10 of the album "La Zampogna in Lucania". However, on the CD, it is FAR from remastered. I've remastered it myself, but I'm afraid if I send out my remastered version I might go to jail! The record company really needs to have a talk because I've been remastering historic recordings, even on "The Northumbrian Smallpipes" album, which too were far from acceptable quality as purchased on ITunes. I guess there isn't really a high-paying job remastering old recordings is there? If so, I'd slam right in.
Anybody own a Zampogna made by the Forastieros? Or someone who trained under them? I don't yet, but I'm sure eager to get my first Zampogna by Valvano. Here is his Youtube channel.
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXc...bgsWQooRIudBWw
By the way, Solfege (which is the old Doh-Reh-Mi system you perhaps thought was invented by Julie Andrews or Mary Martin from the Sound of Music), is how I indicate the notes on the pipes, as every Zampogna is in its own key. The Solfege notes I use to illustrate the tunings are not "fixed" but key-sensitive, that is, take any key's major scale. But when it comes to Solfege in terms of an Italian maker indicating what key a Zampogna plays, it's fixed, where Doh is always the key of C, Fa is F, and so on, but I don't like this system. Don't worry... I never use fixed Solfege, only key-sensitive Solfege. This should make it easier to determine what notes I'm referring to by a given harmonic.
Thanks and good luck with finding the film



Michael
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Old 05-05-2018, 08:59 AM   #2
Tedley
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Default Re: Zampogna: The Forastiero Brothers

In 2000, I bought a six palmi zampogna and a three palmi zampogna, as well as a piffero from Antonio.
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Old 05-05-2018, 09:13 AM   #3
Michael Kazmierski Dunn
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Default Re: Zampogna: The Forastiero Brothers

Ah I heard about that. In fact, in the summer of 2010, I was given a fascinating CD called "La Zampogna", after reading the account on Hotpipes of your journey to Italy to purchase a huge 6P Zampogna from the Forastiero Brothers - he says that Forastiero had been the most esteemed Zampogna makers of that time, and he also mentions that the brothers can be heard on track 10 of the album I'd been interested in buying since reading this, which prompted me to ask my mom to buy it for me. Even though I've heard and got the gist of the Zampogna through Sean Folsom's tracks, with this album I simply got to know the instruments better by assimilating their qualities, exactly as it is with any type of music, including pop, country, opera or yodeling (which is my absolute anathema). Track 10 on that album is the track that Mr. Seeler had recommended to listen to in order to get a feel for what a well-made Zampogna sounds like, and because of this, the particular harmonics produced by these pipes are what I've learned to associate with a good instrument under his guidance. If I didn't read the article about the interesting trip, I really would not have cared, nor would have I even fallen in love with the instrument. And yes, the original version on CD is far from remastered. Would anyone care if I posted a link to my remastered version? Here's how I remastered the album.
This album was originally recorded home-style (very casually as opposed to professional studio recording) on stereophonic or stereo tape back in the 1970's for the most part, released originally as a cassette tape, and it has been rereleased digitally on Cd and, of course, available electronically now. But, be warned, because the tapes were recorded raw, that is simply just recording them and putting them onto Cd, the tracks on the original album as would be bought are of very poor quality, as again none of these are studio recordings, despite being stereo. This is like someone recording a friend singing just with their phone and leaving it as is on a Cd, without bothering to enhance the sound whatsoever. Having said that, I have improved the tracks greatly, so you'll want to listen to this version over the one on Itunes or Amazon.com. In particular the stereo depth on most of them wasn't all that good, and the bass range was originally barely audible, compared to the significant enhancements I've applied, although the occasional cracking associated with tape is too complicated for me to rectify, and despite the cracks, the tapes don't warp. Equivalent to but less occurrent than even the odd instances of cracking, warping was a common problem with tape, and unlike records which have an easily rectifiable constant up-and-down oscillation if warping does exist, tape-warping is, if present, absolutely random and impossible to correct. Most if not all tracks on this album fade in dramatically, and again I've counteracted these heavy fades to one that doesn't require playing with the volume as much as the original. Another disadvantage of these being raw tapes, sometimes an overbearingly loud bump is heard as the tape of a track begins, precluding the complete elimination of some fades. Usually, the track starts out with the Zampogna player striking the bag as we usually do to start the drones (although more often they just blow the pipes up without striking). Unlike most other bagpipes, all the pipes come in at roughly the same time, usually with Sol as their first note. Having first sounded the Sol upon strike-in, the soprano chanter often is the first to change notes, and it often goes down the scale to a Doh, often with a little Ti note before it, similar in Highland piping to a throw on Low A. After that, often a Reh-Sol-Ti chord is being played as the bass chanter sounds the Reh as its first note and the soprano chanter on Ti, followed by a Doh played on both chanters, and then the soprano chanter goes up to a Mi, giving a major chord with the tenor and sometimes sopranina drones. Once this major chord is played, this is often the signal for the Ciaramella to start playing, if present. By the way, this Doh-Sol-Mi chord is the most common chord you'll hear on a Zampogna Achiavi. The Mi is played on the soprano chanter to give the illusion of a supposed Doh an octave below the bass Doh, because the bass chanter provides the second harmonic of the imaginary low note, the drones the third and sometimes the sixth, and the soprano chanter the fifth harmonic. This low G, an octave lower than the bass chanter, though it's created from other tones, is known as a heterotone, which is the difference between two any given pitches, dictated by how many times the pattern repeats itself. For example, if we have the bass chanter at 100 Hertz, the tenor drone at 150, and the soprano chanter at 250, the heterotone is 50. My final modification to most of these tracks addressed a serious tonal issue where they suffered from unintentionally albeit overbearingly heavy or loud sopraninas on the Zampognas, which drastically-to-death drown everything else out. Too much sopranina is like too much cheese on pizza - if there's way too much (as heard on some of the original unremastered tracks), it's pretty much nothing but bare sopranina, and the exact same thing is true about pizza, where too much cheese doesn't make a pizza an actual pizza anymore so much as just a hunk of cheese! Though cheese on pizza can be taken off from a previously cheesy pizza and it would still taste good, eliminating or "notching" the sopranina from a track that already came with it will actually ruin the sound, as the Sol of the soprano chanter will not be heard and the tenor drone will not be harmonically rich at all with a dead tone. So, the best thing to do is to reduce each and every individual harmonic by varying amounts so that they are even with the quieter harmonics - so you will still hear the sopranina in every track that uses one, but it will just be easier to hear the other things going on, compared to the original where literally nothing but the sopranina could be heard. Anyway, with most of the tracks on this tape-recorded album, neither I don't know who plays what instrument, nor do they say so. If I do know who plays what instrument, this is indicated, mostly corroborated by the artists being presented in the order they are first heard, both on a particular track and throughout the album. In other words, even though for the first time a group of performers are given in the order in which they start a track, it doesn't particularly matter if they're out of order in subsequent tracks on which they are featured. In addition there was some sort of online library listing some of the performers and specified what they played, but unfortunately it isn't complete. As just an example, a typical ensemble in the library would have read something like this: "Zampogna Achiavi 6 palmi" or just "6P.: Mike Cataldo, Ciaramella 3P: Abby Linig". These musicians don't play those instruments at all, just an example - however, Abby Linig is, incidentally, a really good opera singer.

@Tedley: You mentioned the Piffero. Is that the Ciaramella? I mean, nobody calls it Piffero anymore last I have checked on Youtube. And BTW I wonder what your pipes actually sound like. I don't know if they're more like as what is heard on track 10, or the Castellana sample which I'll link to a little later.
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Old 05-05-2018, 09:39 AM   #4
Tedley
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Default Re: Zampogna: The Forastiero Brothers

Piffero and ciaramella are the same. It is called one in some areas and the other in other areas. YouTube is not the best source for the "correct" term. It is still used in Italy as well as biffero in a few places. To say "nobody calls it piffero anymore", based on YouTube, is conjecture on your part. Plenty of folks in Italy still use the term, depending on the area.
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Old 05-05-2018, 11:45 AM   #5
Michael Kazmierski Dunn
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Default Re: Zampogna: The Forastiero Brothers

Sorry about that, Ted. It's just that what I've gathered on Youtube I have not seen the word 'pifferro".
Well, here are a couple of versions of the Castellana song with the Forastieros. Previously I'd written an article outlining each track I have pertanent to the Zampogna, and I've sent it to most of my (non-piping) friends. However, to make save time I'll paste in about these specific tracks.
First here's the link to download the two samples in a Zip file.
http://www.filehosting.org/file/deta...Castellana.zip
First, track 10 of La Zampogna (@Ted I'm sure you own a copy)
Track 10 is the only track on this album where we are pleased to hear a Zampogna maker play their own instrument. A 6P Zampogna A Chiave in a rather sharp-pitched G, and in fact about 40 cents flat of an orchestral A-flat, is played, accompanied by a singer who also plays the Ciaramella in the same key, which is 3P. The song is a serenade, and though it may appear to sound redolent to the Novena, it is not the Novena as it does not end with "Tu Scendi Dalle Stelle". Further, the title is "Serenade: La Castellana", or The Castle. Like many of these tracks the sopranina has been reduced and again not totally gone, and the bass chanter dominates the overall sound on pretty much only the left channel, and very little of the singing can be heard. The right channel is mainly focused on the singing and the Ciaramella, although the soprano chanter and the sopranina can be heard under it. Vincenzo and Antonio Forastiero are playing the instruments and/or singing, with Vincenzo on the Zampogna and Antonio singing and playing the Ciaramella. Despite Antonio's lack of vibrato and sometimes off-key notes, he has one of the nicest (or at least the most tolerable) singing voices on the album. Of course, without a doubt, the instruments are Forastiero... d'd'doy!!!!! This is the track that Mr. Seeler had recommended to listen to in order to get a feel for what a well-made Zampogna sounds like, and because of this, the particular harmonics produced by these pipes are what I've learned to associate with a good instrument under his guidance. If I didn't read the article about the interesting trip, I really would not have cared, nor would have I even fallen in love with the instrument.

And the Castellana sample
This is a sample of a track taken from the album accompanying an Italian documentary movie about the Forastiero Brothers, especially about their family, their heritage and their prolific instruments, called "Practice and Mastery", and Charlie Rutan sent me just this sample through Facebook. I'd hope to get both the film and the album from Charlie when I can, as I got David Marker's movie directly from Youtube. In this modicum of a sample, a 6P A Chiave in a 29-flat A-flat, and a Ciaramella are heard, in addition to singing. Obviously, given that these pipes were made by Forastiero, you can hear the amazing tone of the Doh on the bass chanter, particularly the strong harmonic 4 (upper Doh). According to the movie's website as explained by Charlie, the brothers recorded some tracks to accompany the movie, just as most modern movies have accompanying albums. It was produced and recorded in 2003 when both brothers had still been alive. It was their idea that a 6P Zampogna A Chiave has a more satisfactory blend with the voice, compared to a somewhat louder 3P, which is why a 6P is used - that being said, a really good opera singer is by all means able to sing above the volume of an entire orchestra without damaging their voice, such as Laura Bretan or Cecilia Bartoli, two of my personal favorites. The odd thing is, however, that Vincenzo, the older brother, is singing and playing the Ciaramella, and Antonio on the Zampogna. To me, this seems rather strange, as it's usually a younger person playing the Ciaramella and/or singing, with the Zampogna being played by the older person. But, this isn't the case here, even though on track 10 of the tape-recorded "La Zampogna" album it featured Vincenzo on the Zampogna and Antonio on the Ciaramella and singing. Despite Vincenzo's not-so-great voice (which resembles my Dad, haha...) compared to Antonio's on the album, you can hear a slight vibrato in his Ciaramella playing, but this vibrato is rather uneven and inconsistent, like vocal coaches thought Laura Bretan's vibrato on America's Got Talent was, driving her to make it worse. Likewise, the tuning of Antonio's Zampogna could use quite a bit of improvement, even though the tenor and sopranina drones are tuned perfectly to each other, which is again quite the opposite of Vincenzo's well-tuned pipes from a tuning standpoint on track 10. And by the way, compared to that track, the pipes are a lot more mellow, and the sopranina in particular isn't quite as overbearing, but even then it too has been evened out, since I really abhor it. Vincenzo actually starts by playing a complete verse on the Ciaramella before he sings the words, compared to Antonio on the taped album where he first sings the words after a short Zampogna solo. Finally, even though this is the same song as heard on track 10 of that album, the melody is different, inasmuch as it's more aligned to "Tu Scendi Dalle Stelle". It has a much lesser melodic range than the arrangement as sung by Antonio on track 10 of the album, which itself covers the normal Ciaramella range from low F-sharp to the G an octave above. The wider range on track 10 has a melody suggestive of what I recommend female Ciaramella players to sing while performing the Novena. Even though this sample is just under 30 seconds, it's long enough to point these things out.
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Old 05-05-2018, 04:50 PM   #6
Tedley
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Default Re: Zampogna: The Forastiero Brothers

I agree with your critique of the recordings. You are listening very closely.

My 6P is also closer to A flat than G. Most makers don't care about pitch. The zamps are made by measurements such as palmi (or model number in the Scapoli pipes, like modelo 25). The Sicilian ciaramedda (zampogna a paro) were modified some years ago to play in pitches and are sold as being in FA (A), Sol (G) etc. They are sometimes played with fixed pitch instruments, such as the organetto. Being played with single reeds they can be adjusted up or down about a half step in pitch easily. As the A440 pitch standard was not adopted until 1939, the old measurements for Italian zamps have held sway, with no relation to modern pitch. A few makers and players have modified their zampogne to play at modern pitch so they can play with other modern instruments. This is slowly catching on in Italy, but tradition is slow to shift.

I have a 3 1/2 palmi a chiave by Vito Trimarco that sounds great. It can be reeded in modern F.

Last edited by Tedley; 05-05-2018 at 04:56 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 05-05-2018, 05:56 PM   #7
Michael Kazmierski Dunn
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Default Re: Zampogna: The Forastiero Brothers

Well, I have perfect pitch, you know... and I'm blind, hence why I can pick anything out. Just like most of us sighted folks pick out all the visuals, same thing with hearing. Having been blind all my life my brain had been "rewired" to rely on the auditory sense, and the 'hole' in which the vision sense would be emptied is compensated for by an increased awareness of hearing.
BTW do the pipes actually have names? I've heard they're just 'big drone', 'small drone', etc etc even in Italian, but I somehow was thinking that like most other bagpipes the drones and chanters would have clef-based names (i.e. sopranina). Do you know by any chance, or if not, what do you think of the clef-based terms I use? I think "sopranina" is better for that awful drone I dislike because the soprano chanter has lower notes than the sopranina, and on the case with the Surdulina / Ciaramedda pipes they would have a soprano and alto chanter. But I don't think the Ciaramedda uses the sopranina, and I've noticed that fortunately fewer and fewer pipers are using sopraninas since they're becoming aware of a balanced sound, having just taken for granted an almost hidden soprano chanter and an angry-to-killing sopranina in the mix. I think the sopranina as I said before drowns everything else out so much I honestly can't hear the soprano chanters at all on most of the recordings on "La Zampogna". First time I've heard of a sopranina was my friend Sophia, who owns several recorders and introduced me to it, so I thought that would be the most appropriate name for that unnecessarily high-pitch drone.
Finally did you notice the remastering I did with track 10? I'll bet you own a copy of that CD, so I'd compare my remastered version to the original and I think you'll agree it sounds much better. Especially when the damn sopranina is reduced to blend better with the others. Mostly each harmonic on average was reduced by -15 dB using Audacity and a custom tight-band EQ plugin, and of course some harmonics were lowered more than others to not only give a better blend but also to smooth the harmonics out.

Michael

PS. That's pretty cool about your V.Trimarco 4P set. Is it C-sharp or D? I'm sure you don't know the difference harmonically, but maybe if you record each thing alone on both Forastiero sets and the Trimarco, I'll be able to tell you. (i.e., a scale on the soprano chanter alone, bass chanter on its own, tenor by itself, sopranina by itself). It'll probably sound tedious, but it's actually how I create audio samples and loop them to be used in what would eventually come to be an electronic bagpipe project. Or of course sending the samples to Fagerstrom so he can come out with a Zampogna Technopipe! COOL!
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Old 05-06-2018, 02:49 PM   #8
Tedley
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Default Re: Zampogna: The Forastiero Brothers

Sopranino is the Italian name for the small recorder. Clef names are not used for their folk instruments, as they don't read music. The term is only used in art music. The small drone is not used in instruments from Scapoli. That drone is a dummy and is mute, having no bore or reed. The dummy drone is added by makers to "complete the set". Going south to Basilicata and south of there, one finds the small drone active. It is very common in zampogne made in Calabria. The Sicilian ciaramedda may have two or three drones. The third is the small drone and is often stoppered and rarely played. It does tend to overpower the melody chanter. I call it "the screamer" and rarely use it. In a noisy, outdoor setting, it calls attention to the bagpipe by adding presence.

My 3 1/2 palmi Trimarco a chiave had lost its small drone when I got it so I had one made. It plays around the key of F. I will record my stuff when I get some time. The V. Trimarco pipes have a lovely sound. I like the equalization you have applied to the recording. It makes it easier tohear what is going on.
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Old 05-06-2018, 07:33 PM   #9
Michael Kazmierski Dunn
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Default Re: Zampogna: The Forastiero Brothers

Well, according to Wikipedia, "Sopranina" or "Sopranino" refers to literally any instrument beyond the soprano clef, not limited to the recorder, so I guess it would be appropriate to name the pipes after that. Especially regarding how well-versed I am in music - even considering that I like (a few number of) opera singers, and I am not a singer at all. Laura Bretan had been one of my favorites until recently, but it wasn't until I discovered Cecilia Bartoli that I like her better than Laura Bretan.
So, would you like the whole remastered album that I improved? I'm absolutely sure that like track 10 the rest are going to sound billions of times better. I totally wholehartedly agree with you on the line that the sopranina drone is absolutely too loud and drowns everything else out, but from a distance I can see what you mean by making the pipes carry further.
And one final question here. This is mainly on the assumption that I'm going to take the Zampogna up. Obviously being blind, I can't drive or fly myself to Italy, so I'll talk to Quirino Valvano online and order a set from him that way, or perhaps I could use one of these Zampognari around here as the link between myself and the maker. I'm not all that well versed in Italian (except "Vorrei comprare una Zampogna in G non sopranina). I've heard that the soprano chanter on a 3 palmi is about the same spacing apart as a high D whistle, and the bass chanter the spacing of a low D, and I own both of these whistles myself (but I gave my high D to my younger sister as I grew out of it). Is this correct? If so, I wonder how anybody could play the bass chanter on a 6 palmi? If it's twice the spacing of a low D, do they use keys? I don't know anyone's fingers that can stretch out that far apart. So how do they play it? Also, one of my favorite parts of the instrument, where it has it, is the modified tenor drone. Yes, Pietro Ricci is who immediately comes to mind for me! And I think Marco Tomassi plays a 6P with a modified drone. But how do they change the notes physically? I was also aware that the tenor has thumb-holes, but how can one thumb cover three holes? Why doesn't it use keys, as in the D being open, the E-flat pressing one key, the E the key above, and the F the key above that? I can imagine it would be tons easier to equip the tenor with keys rather than straight holes. I'll bet you've seen Ricci or Tagliaferri playing? Again, nobody has ever told me the visuals - all they said was, "It looks like he's holding a stuffed animal or a toddler".
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGRjbZd1Xz4
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTH...EMV-WBa5c2gHlw
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_OwisbILjYQ
Hopefully these links will help.

Michael
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Old 07-15-2018, 09:31 AM   #10
Michael Kazmierski Dunn
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Join Date: May 2015
Location: College: Alma, Michigan, USA / Home: Rockford, Michigan, USA
Posts: 177
Default Re: Zampogna: The Forastiero Brothers

Ok, so I have a question for all of the Zampogna players here on the forums: Have you ever seen this Zampogna film? I think you can buy it from their website and it comes with a CD of the Forastiero brothers playing. Though I'm afraid if I buy it won't be too useful as I speak very little Italian... and I think it's too bad the CD isn't on ITunes. Is it possible you might own a copy?
http://www.azulfilm.com/practice-and-mastery/
Also, I own the CD "La Zampogna Lucana". I've somehow remembered a little booklet that came with the CD stating which type of Zampogna is played on each track, and I believe some information about the pipers as well. I can't read print since I'm blind, so I wonder if you have that as well? If so, I'd like to refresh my memory on it. Here's what I know so far:
Track 1: Zampogna 3 Palmi (Michele Strollo), Ciaramella (Rocco Carbone)
Track 2: Zampogna 6 palmi (Giovanni Palermo), tamburello (Nicola Mazillo)
Track 3: Zampogna 6 palmi, Zampogna 3 palmi, Ciaramella (Leone Luongo)
Track 4: Zampogna 4 palmi (Michele Strollo), Ciaramella (Rocco Carbone)
Track 5: M Fanuele and V Molesano
Track 6: Surdulina (Agostino Troiano)
Track 7: (same thing)
Track 8: Zampogna 6 palmi, Ciaramella 1, Ciaramella 2
Track 9: Zampogna X palmi (Giuseppe Crispino Belviso)
Track 10: Zampogna 6 palmi, Ciaramella and voice (Antonio and Vincenzo Forastiero)
and so on...
Just curious if you happen to have that info. It's fine if you don't, but I'd love to have electronic and particularly screen-reader-friendly version of the booklet - as I'm blind and we only use screen readers. I've looked, I can't find it online.
My next question is,
By the way, I also researched the names of the Zampogna CD's in which I'm very interested to buy. But, unfortunately again, as I don't speak much Italian unless I go on Rosetta Stone or something, buying the CD's direct from the website would be impossible for me... not to mention the exchange rate. Plus it isn't on Itunes or Amazon, so if you don't mind also helping me with trying to get these CD's that would be great also. Unless you have the two CD's yourself and would be willing to either burn physical copies and ship to me or rip them in high quality MP3 and attach them (I'll explain the ripping details later). Here are the names of them.
Le zampogne a Terranova di Pollino
Nel paese dei cupa cupa (attached to a book of the same name)
Both compiled by Zampogna player N. Scaldafferri.
Good lluck,


Michael
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