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History, Tradition, Heritage As related to the subjects of piping, drumming and pipe bands.

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Old 08-12-2017, 10:31 PM   #21
Kelly the boy from...
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Default Re: Celtic ancestry.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pancelticpiper View Post
So how does one determine which Scandinavian DNA came from a person who emigrated to America directly from a Scandinavian country in modern times, and which came from Scandinavian settlement of England, Scotland, and Ireland a thousand years ago?

You could be 66% English, or 41% Irish, or 26% Scottish, in terms of where your ancestors came to America from.
That's true. It's just what was given me. They do indicate overlaps of heritage, especially in GB. My Irish named ancestors go back in documentation to the 18th century in England. So, no diaspora for me.
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Old 08-13-2017, 05:09 AM   #22
SeŠn Donnelly
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Default Re: Celtic ancestry.

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Originally Posted by Paul M Burke View Post
County Mayo is in the Irish Free State. A long way from 100% English.

Paul
The Irish Free State ceased to exist in 1949 when a republic was declared.
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Old 08-13-2017, 05:14 AM   #23
Leong
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Default Re: Celtic ancestry

There was an academic who was presenting a paper and he looked up and across his audience at an international anthropology conference, and said "It's good to see all you Africans at my presentation here today". His audience glanced at each other for a moment wonderingly, and then the penny dropped, and they laughed and applauded

A true story as told by the good prof himself (whose name escapes me at the mo).
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Old 08-13-2017, 06:40 AM   #24
Paul M Burke
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Default Re: Celtic ancestry

Yes I understand the born in England to English parents, but I thought the point of the exercise was where your DNA came from? So if mums' family came from Mayo, do you have Irish DNA?


SeŠn,

I know that. 😉

Paul
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Old 08-13-2017, 12:00 PM   #25
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Default Re: Celtic ancestry

You're right Paul. I suppose that would mean I have Irish DNA. I have never really thought of it that way. For me, I feel as if I am British more than English, the former being more inclusive of my British Isles ancestry.

Charlie
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Old 08-14-2017, 08:16 AM   #26
will103
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Default Re: Celtic ancestry

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leong View Post
There was an academic who was presenting a paper and he looked up and across his audience at an international anthropology conference, and said "It's good to see all you Africans at my presentation here today". His audience glanced at each other for a moment wonderingly, and then the penny dropped, and they laughed and applauded

A true story as told by the good prof himself (whose name escapes me at the mo).
Interesting point and I am glad you mentioned it. How far back do you go to determine your roots? If you go far enough back then we are all related to each other in some way. One other point - actually question - when people get their DNA tested - how do these companies come up with the matches (celtic / norse / etc)? Are they comparing DNA similarity to DNA types currently found in different parts of the world? If so someone who says they are X% Norse is more accurately X% similar to people currently or recently living in Scandinavian countries?

Will
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Old 08-14-2017, 09:23 PM   #27
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Default Celtic ancestry

The typical DNA ancestry tests likely use a suite of DNA markers call microsatellites. These are longish sections of DNA that contain a repeat sequence such as AG repeated 20 or more times in a long row. The nature of DNA replication is such that these repeats motifs get lengthened or shortened. By collecting samples of DNA from around the world, scientists have built up a database of regions in which certain lengths of these repeats are more prevelant than others - they call these haplotypes.

So, when you get your DNA tested, a bunch of different microsatellites get tested.

Here is a link explaining it, but it does get a little complex.

https://genomebiology.biomedcentral....b-2003-4-2-r13

Ancestry.com are not explicit about their methodology, but it is probably something like microsatellites, probably concentrating on human mitochondrial DNA, which is typically inherited along the maternal line in humans.

Charlie
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Old 08-15-2017, 03:21 PM   #28
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Default Re: Celtic ancestry

OY VEY a mixed bag, or maybe in my case bagad, we are. As for Maternal Grandparents, they are of Irish Stock and a story goes that my grandfather was very active with Clan na Gael, and had a distain of all things English. Maternal great grandfather was born upon the Emerald Isle. As for my Fathers side of the equation, very early on his ancestry arrived on the Mississippi Gulf Coast from France, Germany, and Spain. Not of Cajun stock either.
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Old 08-16-2017, 07:06 AM   #29
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Default Re: Celtic ancestry

I highly recommend the book Ancestral Journeys by Jean Manco, available on Amazon.com. He has also come out with a new book, Blood of the Celts. I studied genetics while I was in college as I was a vertebrate paleontology major at the time. I would be very careful about assumptions that just because your ancestor came from a certain country, then you are defined by that nationality. Nationality is not ethnicity. For example, if you are a MacLeod whose forefather was Hromund the Norseman who had a farm on Skye back in the 10th Century AD, then your paternal lineage will trace back to Norway. Likewise if you are descended from Aedh, who landed in Dalriada with his brother, cousin and 150 men and their families, in the 6th Century AD, your male line will trace back to Ireland.

Cheers -

Wes
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Old 08-16-2017, 12:45 PM   #30
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Default Re: Celtic ancestry

Another very interesting book on Celtic history would be Graham Robbís, The Discovery of Middle Earth: Mapping the Lost World of the Celts.

ďAt the end of the Iron Age, the 600-year-old civilization of the Celts stretched from the Black Sea to Scotland. It had produced some of the finest artistic and scientific masterpieces of the ancient world. But in 58 BC, Julius Caesar marched over the Alps, bringing Roman civilization in the form of slavery and genocide. Some Druids (the Celtic intelligentsia) fled to Britain to organize a desperate and ultimately futile resistance there.

While planning a bicycling trip along the Heraklean Way, the ancient route from Portugal to the Alps, Graham Robb made a discovery opening a door to that lost world. Through celestial mathematics, Druids had organized the geography of Europe and Britain into a grid of "solstice lines"óincluding meridians and latitudesóthat determined the placement of towns, temples, roads, and battles, and the pathways of tribal migrations. This amazing book is the story of what Robb found and what it means.Ē
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIl8CxX96Jg
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