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Beer Tent The general discussion forum, and the place to start a new "beer-tent-like" Piping Related discussion...

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Old 04-12-2019, 02:08 AM   #11
Mac an t-Sealgair
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Default Re: Bagpipes and Gaelic

Bha mi ag ionnsachadh Gidhlig airson coig bliadhna agus tha mo clann bheagean ann an GME. Tha seo a' fgail gu bheil ag ionnsachadh deatamachd!!!

It definitely helps with certain idioms, the ones Barry has listed above. It helps you to add colour/light/shade and rhythm to the music.

OK, so its not 'required', and most of the music, most people play is not directly connected to Gaelic being mostly regimental tunes. But, it makes for an interesting siding to pass down and helps the language to thrive.

On a side note it has had a positive effect on other interests such as hill walking regarding hill names / place names. But also flags up the loss of so many local names and terms which I find to be uabhasach bochd.
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Old 04-16-2019, 01:43 PM   #12
Barry Shears
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Default Re: Bagpipes and Gaelic

Thanks for the feed back, very much appreciated . I suppose I am lucky (or unlucky) to have a had a Gaelic speaking grand mother. She didn't teach the language to her children since she was punished for speaking it in the school yard as a young girl, and the prejudice against the language carried through the generations. Still Gaelic could be heard on then lips of several older residents of the coal Mining town of Glace Bay, Cape Breton when I was growing up, and I used to take my parents to milling frolics around the island in the late 1970s and early 1980s. I discovered later that many of the well known bagpipes tunes (with English titles) , also had Gaelic words (usually Port a Beul). I listened to as much of this as I could to develop rhythm within the tunes especially dance music. The port a beul sung in Cape Breton is different rhythmically speaking and is not normally sung as " chopped" as the Scottish versions I hear today in many cases . I suppose this may be from over emphasizing the "Scotch snap" in song versions. The rounder style of singing is certainly reflected in the older style of bagpipe performance. When you include piobaireachd there is probably no other instrument which relies so much on the spoken (sung) word or vocable. Puirt a beul are not normally considered songs, more so as simple rhymes, and their context is usually humorous, satirical, sexual and very local and I have found identical words words can be sung to different melodies, or regional variants . I have found , in Cape Breton at least, the common threads are rhythms designed for step dance music.
A few thoughts
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Old 04-16-2019, 09:30 PM   #13
Army.Bagpiper
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Default Re: Bagpipes and Gaelic

I noticed not too long ago that The National Piping Centre was offering Gaelic Classes locally. I sent a comment to them that it would be great to have classes on-line, but there was no feedback from The Centre.

I would think that there would be some interest, but perhaps not enough.
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Old 04-17-2019, 04:03 AM   #14
CalumII
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Default Re: Bagpipes and Gaelic

If you are interested in learning online, the place to go is Sabhal Mr Ostaig - their ab initio course has three starts per year and is a solid, academic but practical introduction to the language. It is famous for being hard work, but productive.
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Old 04-17-2019, 06:16 AM   #15
Barry Shears
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Default Re: Bagpipes and Gaelic

I took courses through Ulpan a few years ago and that was very helpful, Atlantic Gaelic Academy is also good. The latter is now under the umbrella of the Gaelic College in Cape Breton.
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Old 04-17-2019, 09:04 PM   #16
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Default Re: Bagpipes and Gaelic

Thank you!
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Old 04-17-2019, 11:58 PM   #17
Garry
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Default Re: Bagpipes and Gaelic

Great discussion, although it's all beyond my ken. I too had a beautiful grandmother and grandfather who could speak it, and regret not asking them to teach me. Lots of people would pronounce Gaelic as "Gaylic" and I was always intrigued when my GP's pronounced it, sort of, as "Garlic". Cheers to all, Garry.
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Old 04-18-2019, 05:48 AM   #18
Dave Gallagher
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Default Re: Bagpipes and Gaelic

While the original post is geared to the Scot's Gaelic I must say that one of my good friends teaches Irish. I have wanted to take the course but am too lazy in my old age.
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Old 04-18-2019, 07:35 AM   #19
CalumII
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Default Re: Bagpipes and Gaelic

Quote:
Originally Posted by Garry View Post
Great discussion, although it's all beyond my ken. I too had a beautiful grandmother and grandfather who could speak it, and regret not asking them to teach me. Lots of people would pronounce Gaelic as "Gaylic" and I was always intrigued when my GP's pronounced it, sort of, as "Garlic". Cheers to all, Garry.

Bit of a broad generalisation, but "gaylic" is more of an Irish pronunciation and "gaalic" a Scottish one, at least within the language.
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Old 04-19-2019, 04:35 AM   #20
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Default Re: Bagpipes and Gaelic

I took up Gaelic more out of interest in the language rather than to support my playing. I was lucky in grad school in the 80's to get to know Bill and Mae Nicolaisen. As I worked my way through MacKinnon's book. Bill gave me some basics in pronunciation. Out of school I got a one way ticket to Scotland. While there I spent about 7 weeks in the Outer Isles, four living with an older couple in Ness.

Am I fluent? Absolutely not. I can read some, and speak some. But while listening is enjoyable, I understand little. And anything I say is with a decided Lewis twang.
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