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Old 02-07-2020, 05:15 PM   #1
EquusRacer
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Join Date: Feb 2003
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Default Tutorials

When you're teaching, is there a tutorial you prefer? It could be a base, from which you divert, or you may have your own, or you combine.

While I learned, initially, from the CoP book (aka "The green book"), I've been preferring the Piper's Center tutorial to start, then introducing some other exercises, tunes, etc.

But I'm curious as to what other instructors prefer, modify, etc.
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Old 02-08-2020, 04:24 AM   #2
CalumII
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Default Re: Tutorials

I haven't taught from tutors for a long time as I've never been keen on the progression model they use, which I think is fundamentally responsible for a lot of the stilted playing we hear from novice pipers.


An approach I've been using with some success recently is to start students using only one hand and write a series of graded melodies for the left hand only. Once the left hand is fluent I add the right in, gradually introducing elements of both technique and rhythm. This allows me to look for steady timing and to introduce foot-tapping right from the start. It also means the beginner has a good clear run of steady improvement, which I think improves the chances of them sticking with the instrument.
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Old 02-08-2020, 11:08 AM   #3
EquusRacer
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Default Re: Tutorials

Quote:
Originally Posted by CalumII View Post
I haven't taught from tutors for a long time as I've never been keen on the progression model they use, which I think is fundamentally responsible for a lot of the stilted playing we hear from novice pipers.


An approach I've been using with some success recently is to start students using only one hand and write a series of graded melodies for the left hand only. Once the left hand is fluent I add the right in, gradually introducing elements of both technique and rhythm. This allows me to look for steady timing and to introduce foot-tapping right from the start. It also means the beginner has a good clear run of steady improvement, which I think improves the chances of them sticking with the instrument.

That's a very interesting approach, CalumII. I like some of the elements you're introducing.

I don't mind the progression model, so much; but I do deviate from it. I liked the Piping Center's approach in that it uses some recognizable tunes very early; and while I prefer not to take any students who are focused only on, for instance, playing AG or other and/or just getting outfitted, I do find value and encouragement when a student plays their first tune (Auld Lang Syne, for instance, is an early one in Piping Center).
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Old 02-08-2020, 03:04 PM   #4
CalumII
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Default Re: Tutorials

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Originally Posted by EquusRacer View Post
I liked the Piping Center's approach in that it uses some recognizable tunes very early

I'm not sure I necessarily have the right answer on this, and I'd be interested to hear what others think, but I actually try and avoid well-known tunes until I'm happy that they can "create" music off the page without having to lean on their aural knowledge.



Hand in hand with this is the other plank of my approach, which is to teach sol-fa right from the start and do lots of singing of melodies as well as playing them.
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