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Old 05-15-2018, 02:36 AM   #11
Mac an t-Sealgair
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Default Re: How "soundproof" is a home really?

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Originally Posted by DRCanady View Post
And again, if air can escape, so can sound. The room will need it's own system. Air ducts transfer sound like a megaphone.
Hence the baffles. It's a simple set up. You have a system of alternating foam walls, one left one right etc. There is still a route for the air but it now looks more like ww1 trench if you get my drift
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Old 05-15-2018, 10:24 AM   #12
DRCanady
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Default Re: How "soundproof" is a home really?

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Hence the baffles. It's a simple set up. You have a system of alternating foam walls, one left one right etc. There is still a route for the air but it now looks more like ww1 trench if you get my drift
My band mate built a full on soundproof room in his garage. With 2 guitar amps, a bass amp, full drum kit, and 3 vocal mics going at gig volume, you cannot hear the band from 10' outside the room. He built double walls that do not touch, a double ceiling, and double doors, I think the only way sound waves escape is through the concrete floor. There is carpet but not an isolated floor.

I would be interested to hear how much our 2 sets of pipes can be heard using the room. Will our dB's compare to the rock band?
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Old 05-16-2018, 06:49 AM   #13
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Default Re: How "soundproof" is a home really?

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Originally Posted by DRCanady View Post
My band mate built a full on soundproof room in his garage. With 2 guitar amps, a bass amp, full drum kit, and 3 vocal mics going at gig volume, you cannot hear the band from 10' outside the room. He built double walls that do not touch, a double ceiling, and double doors, I think the only way sound waves escape is through the concrete floor. There is carpet but not an isolated floor.

I would be interested to hear how much our 2 sets of pipes can be heard using the room. Will our dB's compare to the rock band?
I think the room you describe would handle pipes quite well. I know a guy who did precisely what you're describing, and the only thing you can hear outside the room are low guitar chords, and bass.

The loud part for us is rather high frequency, so that's likely to be dampened quite effectively.

Cheers,
~Nate
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Old 05-16-2018, 07:23 AM   #14
el gaitero
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Default Re: How "soundproof" is a home really?

For solo practice...a cemetery works fine,...no complaints.
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Old 05-16-2018, 09:35 AM   #15
bob864
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Default Re: How "soundproof" is a home really?

The correct answer to the original question is "it depends".

Here are some variables:

Windows. If the room has windows then they will probably be the weakest part. If they are double glazed they will leak less than single glazed.

Walls. The more mass, the more sound they will absorb. So if you have a brick house with 5/8" drywall it will block a lot more sound than a house with wood paneling and vinyl siding over plywood.

Ductwork. Ducts open holes in the structure. If you have ducts in the attic and if the attic is vented then you basically have a single layer of either sheet metal or flexible plastic between yourself and the outdoors.

Location. If you have multiple rooms, then you can select the one furthest from a potential listener and close the doors between. Each door will reduce the sound.

Distance. The distance between the outside of the wall and the property line is a factor, because sound dissipates with distance.

Ambient noise. The louder your neighborhood the less it matters. So if you're right next to a busy highway, then a little bit of pipe sound probably won't be noticed. If you're in my neighborhood at night, a little bit of pipe is probably too much ;-)

When we moved here I had my wife go out and see what it sounded like. Her report was that she could hear it, but the birds were louder, and that was with her just a few feet from the house not at property line.

Since then I've done some of my own experiments with rock music and the stereo and I've found that I can make it pretty loud and not be able to hear it at the mail box. So that's a pretty good test method if you have a loud stereo or boom box. Just put in a piping CD and turn it up until it's life like volume and go outside and listen. You can use an app on your phone to determine appropriate volume levels -- just keep the distance uniform. For example, pipe three feet from the meter and observe the SPLs. Then put the boom box where your chanter was and make the same measurement.

edit: Since windows and ducts are probably the weak spots in most people's houses, an easy way to greatly mitigate them is to cut a piece of plywood to make a cover. You can use hanger bolts and wing nuts to make it easy to apply and remove the cover. Shutter hinges are another option. Layers of roofing felt (aka tar paper) can add a lot of mass to a piece of plywood. For floor ducts you can cover them with a concrete paver. Towels block sound from going under doors. Weather stripping can be used to seal doors (especially good if you want to reduce sound movement within your house).
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Old 05-16-2018, 10:29 AM   #16
Mac an t-Sealgair
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Default Re: How "soundproof" is a home really?

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For solo practice...a cemetery works fine,...no complaints.
Dead quiet there................
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Old 05-16-2018, 10:46 AM   #17
DRCanady
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Default Re: How "soundproof" is a home really?

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For solo practice...a cemetery works fine,...no complaints.
There are two within 10 minutes of my house. I wonder what the caretaker would say if I just showed up? I love the sound of pipes outside.

I might even put my second tenor drone back in!
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Old 05-18-2018, 09:28 AM   #18
will granger
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Default Re: How "soundproof" is a home really?

I don't know if it's possible for you, but I often practice in the gymnasium at the school where I teach. I go in early to do it when it is empty. Still, I prefer to practice outside, and have three choice spots where I go. One is at a big park, one is in a parking lot of a local sports arena when nothing is going on, and one is a little side road leading to a large water tank. None of these sports are close to homes, but people still find me occasionally, often to listen. I just don't start playing right next to them, but I will continue if they show up after I have begun.
Look around and be creative in finding spots. Perhaps near a highway where there is already a lot of traffic noise.
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Old 05-18-2018, 09:57 AM   #19
WBpiper
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Default Re: How "soundproof" is a home really?

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Look around and be creative in finding spots. Perhaps near a highway where there is already a lot of traffic noise.

Indeed, I'd say getting creative where to practice/play is part of the fun!
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Old 08-15-2018, 09:24 AM   #20
bob864
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Default Re: How "soundproof" is a home really?

I just ran across an audio engineer's lecture on isolation and sound treatment:

" Bobby Owsinski - Improve the Sound of Your Room for $150 or Less - Nimbus Mentor Sessions #3

Musician, Producer and Author, Bobby Owsinski (http://www.bobbyowsinski.com/) talks about acoustic theory, and how to affordably improve the sound of your room, prevent audio leakage and more."


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1d9WmjTJniI
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