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Go Back   Bob Dunsire Bagpipe Forums > General Discussion > Do It Yourself (DIY)
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Do It Yourself (DIY) Making and repairing of instruments, accessories, and more.

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Old 04-12-2018, 12:34 PM   #1
ACFairbanks
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Default Cutting Bag for Tie-In

Hello,

I just noticed something on my Uilleann Pipes full set that raises a question:

The blowpipe, and the main stock, are tied in in two different ways -

The main stock diameter where it enters the bag is about 1". It was tied in with the standard "star" cut into the leather of the bag, so the leather wraps around the stock as a series of "points of the star."

The blowpipe at the point of entry into the bag is larger, about 1.5". It was apparently tied in by cutting a circular hole in the leather of the bag, and then stretching the leather around the base of the blowpipe. The result is that there are no "star points" to be seen, instead, there is a smooth ring of leather surrounding the blowpipe.

I would be interested in learning about the advantages of either approach.

Thanks for any thoughts on this,

A.C.
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Old 04-12-2018, 12:43 PM   #2
Steve Law
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Default Re: Cutting Bag for Tie-In

I was taught to use the star cut, but once tied off, to remove the points and leave behind as smooth a circle as possible.... just for neatness; no other reason.

Never did get used to making the first cuts though, alway slightly nerve-wracking knowing the cost of another bag if I got it wrong
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Old 04-12-2018, 12:54 PM   #3
el gaitero
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Default Re: Cutting Bag for Tie-In

Yes....no advantage to either ...tho a star can be purposely more easily be made a little ‘tighter’ perhaps with shorter ‘star legs’ before pushing the stock through... ,after soaking,..
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Old 04-12-2018, 02:06 PM   #4
Jim Fogelman
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Default Re: Cutting Bag for Tie-In

I've heard that the star cut can increase the chance of the bag tearing while inserting the stocks, whereas with a circle cut, there are no corners to give an easier tear point.
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Old 04-12-2018, 02:08 PM   #5
milwiron
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Default Re: Cutting Bag for Tie-In

I always felt cutting a circular hole was less likely to tear and it looks nicer without getting a razor blade near the stocks trimming off points. If a tear does happen just gather up more leather and tie it off.

I agree with Steve Law, it doesn't matter how many of my bags or other people's I've tied in, each one is just a tad terrifying.
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Old 04-12-2018, 02:24 PM   #6
el gaitero
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Default Re: Cutting Bag for Tie-In

The star or circle perimeter leather must be thoroughly wetted before inserting a stock to guard against leather splitting while slowly working the stock in. Star points are cut off evenly low with a scissor after tie-in..leaving the classic crenellated finish.
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Old 04-12-2018, 02:45 PM   #7
milwiron
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Default Re: Cutting Bag for Tie-In

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Originally Posted by el gaitero View Post
The star or circle perimeter leather must be thoroughly wetted before inserting a stock to guard against leather splitting while slowly working the stock in. Star points are cut off evenly low with a scissor after tie-in..leaving the classic crenellated finish.
Ah my friend el gaitero, if I ever build a castle I'll go for that classic crenelated finish where it really looks good. Otherwise it's hole punch/round hole, smooth edge, no trimming for me. ;-)

Edit: I will say having those little pointy things sticking up can make tying-in easier if you're having trouble with the leather slipping in to the groove in the stock. They give you something to hang on to even if you have to use needle nose pliers.

Last edited by milwiron; 04-12-2018 at 03:09 PM.
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Old 04-14-2018, 11:06 AM   #8
zarb
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Default Re: Cutting Bag for Tie-In

I generally cut stars, and then insert the stock after the leather is well wetted and stretchy. Then I put a hose clamp (jubilee clamp) on the points, round the stock, tightening things when the stock is correctly oriented. This allows me to handle bag and stock without losing orientation and all is removed when the tie in is complete. The clamp is just to ensure things don't slip about during the tying in process.
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Old 04-17-2018, 07:57 AM   #9
ACFairbanks
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Default Re: Cutting Bag for Tie-In

Quote:
Originally Posted by zarb View Post
I generally cut stars, and then insert the stock after the leather is well wetted and stretchy. Then I put a hose clamp (jubilee clamp) on the points, round the stock, tightening things when the stock is correctly oriented. This allows me to handle bag and stock without losing orientation and all is removed when the tie in is complete. The clamp is just to ensure things don't slip about during the tying in process.

Hello again,

I have a "star cut" question:

I'm soon to tie in a new Kelleher Traditional stitched bag, and so am doing some experimentation before working on the real stuff.

I've been doing a mock tie in process with a dowel as the "stock" and using some elk leather I have that is similar to the the Kelleher bag leather in texture.

When I do the two cuts for the "star" they are quite accurate, and look pretty good because they are reasonably symmetrical. At that point, I have 4 star points.

But, if I try to split each of those, to end up with 8 points, the result is, (what's the word I'm looking for) crappy.

Despite my best efforts, the resulting points are not close to symmetrical, and look awful.

And, so, my question:

From a perspective of function rather than traditional look, is there any reason not to go with the four points that I seem able to cut skillfully? I will, by the way, be moistening the leather before inserting the actual stocks.

Thanks for any thoughts,

A.C.
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Old 04-17-2018, 09:40 AM   #10
piper_hm
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Default Re: Cutting Bag for Tie-In

Quote:
Originally Posted by ACFairbanks View Post
Hello again,

I have a "star cut" question:

I'm soon to tie in a new Kelleher Traditional stitched bag, and so am doing some experimentation before working on the real stuff.

I've been doing a mock tie in process with a dowel as the "stock" and using some elk leather I have that is similar to the the Kelleher bag leather in texture.

When I do the two cuts for the "star" they are quite accurate, and look pretty good because they are reasonably symmetrical. At that point, I have 4 star points.

But, if I try to split each of those, to end up with 8 points, the result is, (what's the word I'm looking for) crappy.

Despite my best efforts, the resulting points are not close to symmetrical, and look awful.

And, so, my question:

From a perspective of function rather than traditional look, is there any reason not to go with the four points that I seem able to cut skillfully? I will, by the way, be moistening the leather before inserting the actual stocks.

Thanks for any thoughts,

A.C.
I use the 8-point star, as I find it evens the tension when you pull the base of each stock through the holes, reducing the chance of the skin tearing.
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