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Beer Tent The general discussion forum, and the place to start a new "beer-tent-like" Piping Related discussion...

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Old 06-24-2019, 10:45 AM   #11
Texas Gael
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Default Re: I.D. Cover sketch on S. Jones tutor

Quote:
Originally Posted by el gaitero View Post
...wonder if it might be a dirk.....
It is a dirk, you can clearly see the handle. BTW Scottish Gaels of yore wore the dirk in the front, it was a symbol of Manhood.

Cheers -

Wes
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Old 06-24-2019, 12:24 PM   #12
zarb
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Default Re: I.D. Cover sketch on S. Jones tutor

Pretty clearly a Dirk, in that the blowstick is accounted for by its presence on the set of pipes.....
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Old 06-24-2019, 02:01 PM   #13
el gaitero
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Default Re: I.D. Cover sketch on S. Jones tutor

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Originally Posted by Texas Gael View Post
It is a dirk, you can clearly see the handle. BTW Scottish Gaels of yore wore the dirk in the front, it was a symbol of Manhood.

Cheers -

Wes
Yes...under a magnifying glass I can make out the pommel more clearly....and imagine the sheath is turned sideways ...so itís hard to recognize as the shape of a tapered blade.
Someone else mentioned his sword....the tip is seen at the left of the pix partly concealed by his Right a kle.
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Old 06-25-2019, 07:40 AM   #14
Adam Sanderson
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Default Re: I.D. Cover sketch on S. Jones tutor

It's a ballock knife. We have several in the museum where I work.
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Old 06-25-2019, 08:25 AM   #15
el gaitero
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Default Re: I.D. Cover sketch on S. Jones tutor

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Originally Posted by Adam Sanderson View Post
It's a ballock knife. We have several in the museum where I work.
I think u r right ..more so than a mere Dirk...tho I didn't notice any ballock's at the guard.
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Old 06-26-2019, 11:02 AM   #16
3D Piper
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Default Re: I.D. Cover sketch on S. Jones tutor

I have a good friend at NAAPD this week (piperdoc on dunsire), I got him to ask Sandy himself.
"Sandy wanted a drawing of an 'old-timey' piper.
He commissioned Donna Neary to do a drawing. Her husband was an Air Force piper and drummer with Sandy.
She did a lot of military drawings.
Retired from USMC as a colonel.
The object laying on his kilt is a dirk.
Donna Neary
Heritage Studios
https://donnaneary.com"

There you go

-Matthew
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Old 06-26-2019, 02:48 PM   #17
el gaitero
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Default Re: I.D. Cover sketch on S. Jones tutor

Quote:
Originally Posted by 3D Piper View Post
I have a good friend at NAAPD this week (piperdoc on dunsire), I got him to ask Sandy himself.
"Sandy wanted a drawing of an 'old-timey' piper.
He commissioned Donna Neary to do a drawing. Her husband was an Air Force piper and drummer with Sandy.
She did a lot of military drawings.
Retired from USMC as a colonel.
The object laying on his kilt is a dirk.
Donna Neary
Heritage Studios
https://donnaneary.com"

There you go

-Matthew
Thank you for reaching out....
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Old 06-27-2019, 04:24 AM   #18
Adam Sanderson
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Default Re: I.D. Cover sketch on S. Jones tutor

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Originally Posted by el gaitero View Post
I think u r right ..more so than a mere Dirk...tho I didn't notice any ballock's at the guard.
Not all ballock knives have the ballocks at the guard. The ballock knife is generally considered the ancestor of the dirk. The main difference is that the handles of ballock knives tend to be turned, so they are cylindrical, whereas the handles of dirks end to be flattened somewhat. We have about 60 or so such dirks in our museum collection, and it's interesting to see them evolve from a nefarious medieval weapon to a highly decorated Victorian fashion accessory.

The ballock knife also always had a flat pommel, which was necessary for it to work in the manner intended. It had to be sturdy.

For those that are unaware, the ballock knife was used in conjunction with the Lochaber axe. The Lochaber axe was a long pole ending in blade with a hook on the end, which was used to unseat armoured horsemen. Once the horseman had been pulled to the ground, he would still be heavily armoured. The weak spot of medieval armour was the groin, as there had to be movement there to allow the armoured horseman to straddle his steed. A team of three would be used, two would hold the unfortunate rider's legs apart.

The third man would then insert the ballock knife into the crevice between the rider's legs in the armour and would then strike the flat pommel with a mallet, until the blade had been driven up through the scrotum, prostate and bladder into the small intestine.

Ponder on that next time you strap a dirk on.
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Old 06-27-2019, 08:35 AM   #19
Bob Harper
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Default Re: I.D. Cover sketch on S. Jones tutor

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adam Sanderson View Post
Not all ballock knives have the ballocks at the guard. The ballock knife is generally considered the ancestor of the dirk. The main difference is that the handles of ballock knives tend to be turned, so they are cylindrical, whereas the handles of dirks end to be flattened somewhat. We have about 60 or so such dirks in our museum collection, and it's interesting to see them evolve from a nefarious medieval weapon to a highly decorated Victorian fashion accessory.

The ballock knife also always had a flat pommel, which was necessary for it to work in the manner intended. It had to be sturdy.

For those that are unaware, the ballock knife was used in conjunction with the Lochaber axe. The Lochaber axe was a long pole ending in blade with a hook on the end, which was used to unseat armoured horsemen. Once the horseman had been pulled to the ground, he would still be heavily armoured. The weak spot of medieval armour was the groin, as there had to be movement there to allow the armoured horseman to straddle his steed. A team of three would be used, two would hold the unfortunate rider's legs apart.

The third man would then insert the ballock knife into the crevice between the rider's legs in the armour and would then strike the flat pommel with a mallet, until the blade had been driven up through the scrotum, prostate and bladder into the small intestine.

Ponder on that next time you strap a dirk on.
Oh, Lord. Thanks for the additional information, Adam - I guess. I'm sitting here with my legs crossed.
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Old 06-27-2019, 06:52 PM   #20
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Default Re: I.D. Cover sketch on S. Jones tutor

I think I prefer the Wikipedia version that says the name was simply due to the resemblance of the handle to the male anatomy.

Even though I am a nasty vicious Scot through and through and way back to medieval times I find the alternative explanation of the name to be cruel and inhuman. If you have the chap in such a position as to have time for three of you to go about killing him in such a brutal and unsporting fashion surely you equally have him in a position where you could just as easily hog tie him and ransom him out later on.
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