Welcome to
the forums at bobdunsire.com
bobdunsire.com forums bobdunsire.com forums
You can reset your password by going here. Be sure to try your current email and any email addresses you may have had in the past.
Otherwise please use the Contact Us link at the bottom of the forums. In order to help you, please provide the following info: Your Display Name from the old forum and any possible email addresses you would have used before. Without that info we cannot locate your account.


Go Back   Bob Dunsire Bagpipe Forums > Great Highland Bagpipe > Beginners, Intermediate, +
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Beginners, Intermediate, + Discuss issues, tackle problems, share experiences, ask questions, and look for specific help...

Platinum Sponsors
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 10-21-2014, 01:05 PM   #1
ObanPiper
Forum Member - Shy or Quiet
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Scotland
Posts: 6
Default Reading Music.

Hi Guys. As a Newbie to the site I apologise if this thread seems daft.. I have been surrounded by piping all my life and learnt the chanter over 30 years ago.. I am now going back to learning again and have a fantastic Instructor. I know many many pipe tunes by ear. But I am struggling to read music..

Any Sensible tips to help me ?

Cheers
Rob
ObanPiper is offline   Reply With Quote
Gold Sponsor
Old 10-21-2014, 01:49 PM   #2
Rooklidge
Holy smoking keyboard!
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: CA
Posts: 1,488
Default Re: Reading Music.

This is working for me, but I'm sure others have tips that may be a better fit.
For the tunes you know, look at the music and set a beat with your foot, spot the note on each beat and sing along as you drop your foot to the beat. Only go as fast as you can keep the beat and sing the tune. Eventually the patterns will be familiar enough that you begin to read the notes within each bar.
Try Black Bear and Highland Laddie. These will open up the D throw and G/D/E gracenotes. After 38 years of being a by-ear drummer and knowing many tunes like yourself, I use this method for learning new tunes now that the pipes are my hobby. I still get confused and have to slow it way down, but it feels good to look through an unknown sheet of music and say to yourself "Oh, I know THAT tune!".

Last edited by Rooklidge; 10-21-2014 at 01:51 PM.
Rooklidge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2014, 02:12 PM   #3
redmist
Forum Silver Medal
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Derbyshire
Posts: 370
Default Re: Reading Music.

When I first started back on the pipes after 26 years off I could easilly follow the music to the tune but if I had to learn one from scratch I struggled to figure out how it was supposed to sound melody weise .one tip I had was to get an unknown to you peice of music then find the tune on youtube etc and follow it , it was great you could stop it and break it down repeat it etc , from then on it just came In time. The other thing you should do is drain all the knowlege you can from your tutor .remember there are no stupid questions so don t be afraid to ask them
redmist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2014, 02:24 PM   #4
snowbear
Forum Silver Medal
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: All over
Posts: 449
Default Re: Reading Music.

When I started out practicing the scale, I memorized how each note sounded on the chanter. That way I can now see a note written and imagine the sound it represents. As far as the note values, it's just a matter of simple math.

Every once in a while I look up a tune I don't know and try to play it on my practice chanter. By starting out with simple tunes, I could advance into playing fancier tunes by just looking at the music and play. Its a bit like learning to read; memorize the letters, remember the sound of each letter, put them together, say them out loud.
__________________
Never sacrifice clarity for speed
snowbear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2014, 02:30 PM   #5
HighlandPark
Holy smoking keyboard!
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 1,114
Default Re: Reading Music.

I am recent to pipes and while I can read music I cannot easily lift the tune off of the page particularly with this new medium, pipe music. However, the tune literally lifts itself off of the page if I have the tune in my head; being able to listen to the tune multiple times as often as we want is really one of the key advantages of learning the pipes these days.

Take advantage of recordings wherever you can, including those by your instructor; my instructor is fantastic and will literally send me recordings at all hours of the day.

Additionally, when learning fiddle years ago I came across the advice of listening to music an equal amount of time to that of your practice time e.g., an hour for hour. It does not always even have to be the exact music you are learning, but just something from within the idiom or genre. That advice has been critical to much of my success on any of my instruments.
__________________
David Locky
Aim for the moon, you might hit an eagle ... Bagpipe Ecology
HighlandPark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2014, 01:36 AM   #6
ObanPiper
Forum Member - Shy or Quiet
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Scotland
Posts: 6
Default Re: Reading Music.

Thanks for all your replies guys.. I'm so glad that I joined the forum. Some excellent pieces of advice and experience given regarding my "Quest" to read music properly..

Cheers... Rob.
ObanPiper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2014, 05:03 AM   #7
classicbagpipes
Holy smoking keyboard!
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Atlanta, Ga
Posts: 2,398
Default Re: Reading Music.

I tell students there are two parts to reading music what note is it and how long do I have to play it.
Start out by learning to recognize the notes and where your fingers should be on the chanter. A very simple technique is the use of flash cards which I have used for years to teach reading of notes.
How hard can that be with only 9 notes? ( I know you have heard that before)

But it is true, the harder part to reading music is how long do I have to play that particular note. That usually takes a bit more work but it can be done. Knowing where the beat falls and how many notes you have to squeeze in between that beat and the next is the key. Also having an understanding of time signatures, which I am sure your tutor can help you with.
__________________
Practice Hard, win easy!
Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection we can catch excellence.
Vince Lombardi
classicbagpipes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2014, 08:01 AM   #8
Pip01
Holy smoking keyboard!
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: North America
Posts: 3,379
Default Re: Reading Music.

Greetings, ObanPiper, and to All,

Firstly... Welcome aboard!! :) And... quite pleased to
have you with us... in this... our musical pot o' soup!... :)

As to the reading of the music.. worry not... and neither
be you dismayed.

Just keep after it... and it will come! (Promise!)

And... somewhere... down the road... you will be able to
see...and to play... the music... just as easily as you can
now read...and speak... these written lines now before you.

************************************************** *****************

In thinking upon these things... and...if... I may take the liberty...

...To all whom else... are now... or who shall... have to strive and
slog their way through this particular thicket... and especially to
those over and past that half-century mark of 50... (Lucky you! :)... :

Endeavor to view this now-future-but-soon-to-be accomplishment
as quite simply... learning a new language... to be both read with
the eye... and to be spoken... with the fingers... just as if you were
typing out a page that you were reading from some text.

The internal mechanism... is quite the same... and is a damned
bit easier... than contending with valences... or even trying to
write a decent sonnet...

One of the better... if not the best... methods I have encountered
for this learning... is the one first given in the original College of
Piping Tutor Book... and is still to be found in all of its subsequent
editions...and to which I still refer all inquiries...

As in all else that is of worth... just keep after it... and it will come!

Regards to ObanPiper, and to All,

Pip01

__________________
My friends all know,
With what a brave carouse...

Last edited by Pip01; 10-22-2014 at 08:22 AM.
Pip01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2014, 02:45 PM   #9
KJPiper
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 31
Default Re: Reading Music.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HighlandPark View Post
I am recent to pipes and while I can read music I cannot easily lift the tune off of the page particularly with this new medium, pipe music. However, the tune literally lifts itself off of the page if I have the tune in my head; being able to listen to the tune multiple times as often as we want is really one of the key advantages of learning the pipes these days.

Take advantage of recordings wherever you can, including those by your instructor; my instructor is fantastic and will literally send me recordings at all hours of the day.

Additionally, when learning fiddle years ago I came across the advice of listening to music an equal amount of time to that of your practice time e.g., an hour for hour. It does not always even have to be the exact music you are learning, but just something from within the idiom or genre. That advice has been critical to much of my success on any of my instruments.
This was a big help for me. I find that having the tune in your head makes it way easier to get the rhythm of the tune. I played guitar as a kid and can read music well. The timing and such is so different to me on the bagpipes so basic dotted quarter note theory doesn't' always apply, i.e. its a 2/4 so hold the first beat a bit more and cheat the second. Now getting the fingers to know what the brain is thinking is a whole different story
KJPiper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2014, 05:11 AM   #10
classicbagpipes
Holy smoking keyboard!
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Atlanta, Ga
Posts: 2,398
Default Re: Reading Music.

But having the tune in your head is "learning by ear....still". If you learn to read music properly than as one of my students said to me once, "its sort of like a code isn't it" Which was so true. And I have used that ever since. Once you unlock the code there is usually no need to hear the tune first. You can play it in your head or with you hands and make it sound musical from the get go. Maybe not up to speed but the tune is there.
Last night I had a student who is musical and reads music very well already AND he taught himself the pipes. He sight read right through the tune Atholl and Breadalbane Gathering. He did it quite well and I know he will have the tune off for next week.
And he has only been playing about 3-4 months and on top of that he placed in the solo competition for the first time at Stone Mt Games.
__________________
Practice Hard, win easy!
Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection we can catch excellence.
Vince Lombardi
classicbagpipes is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Silver Sponsor

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:33 AM.