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Judging flourishing routines in band competitions

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  • Judging flourishing routines in band competitions

    I love the flourishing routines the midsection brings to a band performance.
    How can we start adding a judge for that?
    Currently, the midsection is only judged on their rhythm.


    -Matthew

  • #2
    Re: Judging flourishing routines in band competitions

    PPBSO had a Bass & Tenor Section judge for a short time, experimental IIRC. That was starting up about 10 or 12 years ago. It did not really go far, and was scrapped a few years later.

    I've seen a few ensemble judges comment, but very, very rarely. I'm not sure about the idea of a "visual effects" judge. But, that's just me.
    Pete
    FUBAR Highlanders P&D
    ====
    Good Drumming: Pure Magic

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    • #3
      Re: Judging flourishing routines in band competitions

      We have often gotten comments on the visual contributions of the tenor corps, but agree that for the amount of work they put in, there is little tangible evidence of the impact.

      I've always felt that the tenor corps is critical for conveying the professionalism and poise of a group, primarily because they are the most interesting thing to watch. The level of confidence they transmit can either reinforce or detract from the overall impact of the group.

      The visual aspect is one of those things that certainly plays into how much a judge likes a group, but is tough to really capture in a score sheet.
      Mike Postma - Wasatch and District Pipe Band

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      • #4
        Re: Judging flourishing routines in band competitions

        I've always felt that the tenor corps is critical for conveying the professionalism and poise of a group, primarily because they are the most interesting thing to watch. The level of confidence they transmit can either reinforce or detract from the overall impact of the group.
        I completely agree!

        Lazy tenor routines make the whole band seem blah..

        But crisp energetic routines with big arm movements and quick flourishes give lift and energy where needed and really accent the melody..

        Some of my own tenors may compete with a band at Stone Mountain, and we were a bit confused at the tenor scores when there were no flourishes written in.. Now we know why..



        -Matthew

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        • #5
          Re: Judging flourishing routines in band competitions

          A little late to the party here - It may be because all sections of the band are scored on the auditory aspect, not the visual.

          If you look at the transition the tenor position has taken in the last, say, 45 years - from it being visual only when I was little - remember the crocheted tassels on the mallets, and they breezed over the drum head, hardly touching it at all? To rhythm only in the 80's, no flourishing at all - and now to the very technical flourishing and scores with voiced drums.

          The tenor section has really seen a big transition, (bass also, but not as dramatic). I can remember when the midsection was rarely mentioned at all by many drumming and ensemble judges, so a big change has occurred (to the positive) in that aspect as well.

          Just a thought.
          Margaret
          Forum Clasp
          Last edited by Margaret; 08-13-2017, 05:44 PM.
          Margaret

          Sarchasm (n): The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn't get it.

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