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Tenor Settings

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  • #16
    Re: Tenor Settings

    With a bass and three tenors I first sample the bass drone of the tuned pipe and set the A to read 0 by adjusting the calibration of the tuner up or down. The frequency of A is shown in the upper left corner of the meter (Korg CA30). It is usually anywhere from 476 to 480 depending on weather.

    I tune the bass and high tenor to A 0. That is the meter shows an A in the upper right corner and the needle is on 0. The high tenor is an octave above the bass.

    Once that is done the low tenor is tuned to C# -14 on the meter and the middle tenor is tuned to E +2 on the meter.

    I agree with the comment about the midsection staying in the sun after tuning if you are finally going to play in the sun. This helps keep the tuning from wandering.

    I also find that using the tuning of the pipes, A C# E A, instead of Bb D F Bb less confusing, since you are not constantly transposing between the pitch of their A and the pitch of concert A. The only time I have to resort to using Bb D F Bb is when the pitch of the A exceeds the calibration of my tuner, i.e. above 480. In that case I reset the tuner to 440 and do the calibration to match the pitch of the bass drone to Bb on the tuner, and then tune to Bb D F Bb.

    tomm
    Tom MacKenzie
    Holy smoking keyboard!
    Last edited by Tom MacKenzie; 08-11-2011, 10:11 AM.
    [email protected]

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    • #17
      Re: Tenor Settings

      I am totally confused here and I didn't know it. Band's drone police use the same CA30 as I do and I'll ask as they're going around the pipe corps where they are. 453-455, depending on the weather, etc. So I set my bass and A tenor to that pitch (Bb on tuner) and go from there.

      In these posts I see references to 476-480 for using the tuner at A, so my question is, what's the upside/downside to using the tuner on Bb-F-D outside of the transposing bit (which I just do because that's how I learned)

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      • #18
        Re: Tenor Settings

        Good question, Robin.

        For me, it's about this (remembering that I'm more of a drone tuning guy that then helps out the mid-section): It's about how the pitch moves for the pipes, and then not wanting to transpose every note. Why call the tone A by the name Bb when everyone calls it A? And then I just pretend that the # (ie 478) attached to A is sort of like a sliding baseline for the tone.

        So instead of doing a lot of math, I just tell myself that A is 478 right now. 10 minutes later it's 479. On my tuner it will actually say "A" in the little read out by the VU meter. And then when I check the C# on the tenor, it says C#, or sometimes - if the drum is sharp - D... Again, I'm not transposing and making mistakes. Lastly - I have the meaning for those numbers embedded in my cranium. 482 is pushing it, and getting thin. 472 is thick. 478 is beautiful for our chanters. For me, it's just plain old easier.

        Tom: I agree with everything you said.

        Scott
        Chairman Mao
        Holy smoking keyboard!
        Last edited by Chairman Mao; 08-12-2011, 07:45 PM.

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        • #19
          Re: Tenor Settings

          Start using your tuners as ear training tools instead of drum tuning tools and start tuning by ear. Forget about concert pitch anything. And please just use Bagpipe note names and stop converting to Concert pitch names or for heavens sake, chord names!
          My mistake 25 years ago for starting it all. No wonder Ian Mac looked at me so weird!
          The GHBP is not based on Western harmonics...at all.
          It came from Egypt!
          HOSS

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          • #20
            Re: Tenor Settings

            Yup.

            I use the tuner to get me close, and not seconding guessing, as time is tight. Then the ear kicks in to get it right.

            My ear gets us the sound we want.

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            • #21
              Re: Tenor Settings

              everyone is going between A# and Bb for tuning does everyone know they are the same note?
              Paul

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              • #22
                Re: Tenor Settings

                No, they are not the same note. They might sound the same, when you just bang it out on a piano, but they are not the same note.

                A# is A#. Bb is Bb. They have a different temper. A different reason to be. A different scale to which they are attached. And they behave differently.


                Scott

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                • #23
                  Re: Tenor Settings

                  STOP with the Concert Pitch Names!

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                  • #24
                    Re: Tenor Settings

                    Originally posted by Hossman View Post
                    STOP with the Concert Pitch Names!
                    Easy there, tiger. He asked about the difference between A# and Bb. Nothing about anything else .

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