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After market metal sleeves for tuning pins???

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  • After market metal sleeves for tuning pins???

    Not sure if this is possible or not; I certainly am having a difficult time finding products or an answer - maybe you all could help!

    I was wondering if there is such a thing as add-on metal tuning pin sleeves that you can add to your bagpipe?
    I could be totally ignorant of the anatomy of pipes that have metal sleeves but wouldn't it be possible to make a metal aftermarket sleeve that slips onto the pin?
    My interest is purely cosmetic (e.g. making my basic Delrin McCallum pipes look a little more flashy).

    Thanks for any comments!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Bassbone_mh View Post
    Not sure if this is possible or not; I certainly am having a difficult time finding products or an answer - maybe you all could help!

    I was wondering if there is such a thing as add-on metal tuning pin sleeves that you can add to your bagpipe?
    I could be totally ignorant of the anatomy of pipes that have metal sleeves but wouldn't it be possible to make a metal aftermarket sleeve that slips onto the pin?
    My interest is purely cosmetic (e.g. making my basic Delrin McCallum pipes look a little more flashy).

    Thanks for any comments!
    Have you asked McCallum if they could do it for you?. I ordered my own acetyl pipes new ...and with tuning pin sleeves.

    to be considered::
    1)the pins might need be turned down a bit to accept the I.D. of the sleeve. The pin finished wall thickness might be unacceptable. ( assuming the acetyl pins have no warp)
    2) if the pins fit without turning down...the tenor and bass tone chamber bores might need to be enlarged to receive the new sleeve O.D...might be an unacceptable bore impacting the tone

    The expense of what you wish to achieve might suggest to sell those pipes for the best price and buy new of what you really want.

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes. Ask McCallum first; a reputable pipe maker second (but I'm sure you'll get satisfaction from McCallum).

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Bassbone_mh View Post
        Not sure if this is possible or not; I certainly am having a difficult time finding products or an answer - maybe you all could help!

        I was wondering if there is such a thing as add-on metal tuning pin sleeves that you can add to your bagpipe?
        I could be totally ignorant of the anatomy of pipes that have metal sleeves but wouldn't it be possible to make a metal aftermarket sleeve that slips onto the pin?
        My interest is purely cosmetic (e.g. making my basic Delrin McCallum pipes look a little more flashy).

        Thanks for any comments!
        Yes, and no. McCallum should be your first point of contact, but you'll almost certainly need to have your pipes turned down. The tuning pins' thickness is the issue here, so these will/would be turned down to give the wiggle room for sleeves without altering the size of any bores.
        Jack
        Serving Jello with a ladle since... forever

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by jackhawkpiper97 View Post
          ...but you'll almost certainly need to have your pipes turned down...
          Yes, this is the thing, like jayhawkpiper97 says, you would either need to turn down the pins to fit the sleeves so the overall diameter is the same—or NOT recommended would be to make the bores bigger to fit the diameter fo the wider sleeves. It's not really a DIY project . . . I guess unless you have a lathe and don't mind perhaps messing up a $1,000+ instrument. I think it'd be worth the price to send your pipes off to a professional and have them do the fitting of the sleeves.

          Andrew
          Andrew T. Lenz, Jr. BDF Moderator
          BagpipeJourney.com - Reference for Bagpipers

          Comment


          • #6
            And... if you're going to do all of that--
            is a bit o' silver--out of the question??
            (Just a thought. :-)
            My friends all know,
            With what a brave carouse...

            Comment


            • #7
              I hesitate to suggest this because I like the look of plain tuning pins and I never saw the modification in person (only photos); however, there was someone on here years ago, who dressed up a set of poly Dunbar pipes using alumin(i)um tape. It was the kind of tape you use for temporary exhaust pipe repairs. That person added ferrules using aluminum tape but it could possibly work for slides as well. It is not very thick so might just fit inside the bore of the top section of each drone. The person who added ferrules did a great job carefully cutting the tape to fit, without wrinkling it and the result was surprisingly good looking.

              If that doesn't grab your attention, I agree with the rest of the recommendations to ask McCallum; they would likely have to turn down your tuning pins to make anything else fit.

              Good luck with it,
              Kevin

              Comment


              • #8
                I was going to suggest the same thing as Kevin. Cheaper, quicker, and reversible.
                You don't have fun by winning. You win by having fun.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I think adding metal sleeves to the pins is something that any pipemaker can do. It's a routine thing because whether done when they make a new set of pipes, or an aftermarket addition to an existing set of pipes, the process is similar.

                  Yes the wood pins, and the ivory hemp stops if present, have to be turned down to the ID of the silver tubes.

                  I had David Naill add engraved silver sleeves to a set of 1930s full ivory Lawries, the result was quite beautiful. In some ways I prefer that look to the look of half silver/half ivory sets.

                  For sure you don't want to bore out the tone chambers! Their ID is a crucial part of the internal bore profile.

                  This Scots Guards Pipe Major (I believe to be Robert Crabb) did a photo shoot around 1960 which was widely used for BOAC posters and album covers.

                  Note his full-ivory pipes with the silver slides and silver & ivory mouthpiece, Runic pattern Frederick Narborough silver, quite lovely.



                  pancelticpiper
                  Holy smoking keyboard!
                  Last edited by pancelticpiper; 01-12-2022, 04:10 AM.
                  proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; Son of the Revolution and Civil War; first European settlers on the Guyandotte

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by pancelticpiper View Post
                    I


                    Note his full-ivory pipes with the silver slides and silver & ivory mouthpiece, Runic pattern Frederick Narborough silver, quite lovely.
                    ]
                    I m curious...how known it is FN silverwork?
                    Aside....In the photo mentioning the Gordon’s....my understanding was they had a distinction of being the only ones named ‘The Drums and Pipes of the Gordon Highlanders’ ...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by el gaitero View Post

                      I'm curious...how known it is FN silverwork?
                      FN is the maker's mark for Frederick Narborough, Birmingham.

                      Their silver was used by a number of different pipemakers. They also made sporran cantles, belt buckles, and so forth, all done in their distinctive "chased" patterns (thistle, runic, and zoomorphic).

                      In 1962 the maker's mark changed to D&N due to the firm becoming Dalman & Narborough, Birmingham.

                      Here's a variety of FN work



                      Three different FN cantles. Note that on cantles they might combine the various patterns (thistle, Runic, zoomorphic).

                      Did they combine those patterns on bagpipe mounts?

                      pancelticpiper
                      Holy smoking keyboard!
                      Last edited by pancelticpiper; 01-16-2022, 04:18 PM.
                      proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; Son of the Revolution and Civil War; first European settlers on the Guyandotte

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by pancelticpiper View Post

                        FN is the maker's mark for Frederick Narborough, Birmingham.

                        Their silver was used by a number of different pipemakers. They also made sporran cantles, belt buckles, and so forth, all done in their distinctive "chased" patterns (thistle, runic, and zoomorphic).

                        In 1962 the maker's mark changed to D&N due to the firm becoming Dalman & Narborough, Birmingham.

                        Here's a variety of FN work



                        Three different FN cantles. Note that on cantles they might combine the various patterns (thistle, Runic, zoomorphic).

                        Did they combine those patterns on bagpipe mounts?

                        Yes...I knew a lot about FN and D&N over the past past few decades ....was wondering how in the original post you knew Pipey Crabbs’ pipes were marked FN....

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by el gaitero View Post

                          Yes...I knew a lot about FN and D&N over the past past few decades ....was wondering how in the original post you knew Pipey Crabbs’ pipes were marked FN....
                          I don't know they're hallmarked FN but the mouthpiece tube 100% looks like Frederick Narborough work. It's possible that another silversmith has copied an FN pattern, but offhand I don't remember seeing examples of that. Frederick Narborough began in 1850 thus predating Henderson, Lawrie, etc.
                          proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; Son of the Revolution and Civil War; first European settlers on the Guyandotte

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