As related to the subjects of piping, drumming and pipe bands.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

"Black" as a title ?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Re: "Black" as a title ?

    Well... Glad my name's not Mahoney.
    James

    Adirondack Pipes and Drums
    ---------------------------
    Did he say "By the left" or "By the right"? Is this the parade set or the competition set? Oh, for [email protected]#t's sake!!

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: "Black" as a title ?

      There is a jig in John Wilson's collection which Willie Ross told him was named 'Breamatain Tonn Dubh', and another tune called 'Tha tonn air a Bhata Mor': there's a hole in the big boat. Context affects meaning.

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: "Black" as a title ?

        Originally posted by Bryn:
        I've been told, but never verified, that the Albanach translation of 'Kiss my ass' is Pogue Mahon,
        Well, you've been misinformed, that's incorrect Irish Gailge, but still not near the Albannach for anus which can be toll-t˛ine, (masc), t˛n, (fem), raitse, (masc) or noig, (fem).
        Gu dearbh, tha mi cÓnranach, this is getting quite far from the original question and into the schoolyard. Let's look up rude words....

        As previously stated, Dubh means black or dark. The opposite was finn or fion, which means light or blond. These definitions were used to distinguish between the invading Norwegian and Danish Vikings who settled.
        Hence; MacDougall =son of the dark invader
        MacFingal = son of the blonde invader.
        Callander Pipe Band FB page Please click and "like". Thanks
        Lowland and Borders Piper's Society

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: "Black" as a title ?

          While the subject of nicknames is still on the boil, readers might check out the thread in this forum dealing with 'Anachie Gordon', this being a good example of a nickname derived from one's stamping ground, home, or property, a tradition still current in the highlands. Many were called by names such as 'Pennygael' (Hector MacFadyen of...)'Kilberry' ( Campbell of...)or 'Rothiemurchis' (Grant of...)
          However, the more punctilious sometimes objected to the first usage (Pennygael) because he wasn't the actual owner of the estate like the latter two, for whom it was a proper title. But tradition pays no heed to such pretentions.

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: "Black" as a title ?

            This Gaelic tendency seems to be alive and well in Texas. My old PM, born here but of a Texas family, immediately gave nicknames to everyone in the band. Often we had no idea what someone's real name was. He, however, seemed to be strangely nickname-proof. George W Bush, if you recall, came up with nicknames for people in the Press Corps (which didn't go over well).
            Mulligan's On The Blue, an Irish pub on Maui, has a number of Irish phrases with English tranlations on their place mats, among which is: "Pog mo hAoin (Have a Nice Day)"
            proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; Son of the Revolution and Civil War; first European settlers on the Guyandotte

            Comment


            • #21
              tha dubh brŔagha!!
              My Musical Projects:
              The Thistle Amongst the Lilies...Quebec's First Collection of Pipe Music!
              Supersonic Tartan Death Machine

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by maitland View Post
                Re: "Black" as a title ?

                While the subject of nicknames is still on the boil, readers might check out the thread in this forum dealing with 'Anachie Gordon', this being a good example of a nickname derived from one's stamping ground, home, or property, a tradition still current in the highlands. Many were called by names such as 'Pennygael' (Hector MacFadyen of...)'Kilberry' ( Campbell of...)or 'Rothiemurchis' (Grant of...)
                However, the more punctilious sometimes objected to the first usage (Pennygael) because he wasn't the actual owner of the estate like the latter two, for whom it was a proper title. But tradition pays no heed to such pretentions.
                To have the 'of' somewhere, I believe you have to be the Laird. There for unless you actually are THE Laird at the time, you cannot be someone 'of' somewhere. FWIW Archibald Campbell is wrongly referred to as Archibald Campbell of Kilberry, When he should really be referred to as Archibald Campbell, Kilberry. This being because he was not the Laird/owner of the Kilberry estates. Col. John Campbell of Kilberry, Archibald Campell's older brother was the Laird and got the 'of'.

                The term Black in English usage can refer to an unsavoury character, So, Black Will might have been just a wee bit errrr.......mental.

                As has been eluded too, in the Gaidhealtachd dubh, ban, ruadh, mor, beag etc can all be descriptors usually to do with physical appearance. On the subject of nicknames (especially in the Highlands), most people have nicknames as if you used there actual name it would identify about 10 people
                https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=484684802046790


                Sometimes the nickname is a descriptor as in Ban, Ruadh et cetera, sometimes its a patronymic as in Ruairidh Don (Ruairidh son of Don), other times the place you live is used Alasdair Caolas (Alasdair from Kyle). Other nicknames can be more of an insult, but these are generally few and far between
                Last edited by Mac an t-Sealgair; 09-14-2021, 02:16 AM.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Mac an t-Sealgair View Post

                  To have the 'of' somewhere,
                  Perhaps worth pointing out that the guy you're replying to hasn't logged in for 14 years so you may not get a response.
                  Cheers
                  Scratch

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Scratcher View Post

                    Perhaps worth pointing out that the guy you're replying to hasn't logged in for 14 years so you may not get a response.
                    Cheers
                    Scratch
                    HA! Cheers! I didn't realise how old this thread is!!!

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Bryn View Post
                      Re: "Black" as a title ?

                      I've been told, but never verified, that the Albanach translation of 'Kiss my ass' is Pogue Mahon, which would, in my limited understanding of Albanach Gaelic, make 'Pogue' == 'Ass'. I'd happily google it for you, except that I've a tendency to absorb that stuff and use it...
                      It's "Pog mo thon", and I've only heard that from Americans pretending to be Irish. ( Seen it n a few bumper stickers and T shirts as well)
                      Slainte Leibh/ Slan Leat, Bob Cameron

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Klondike Waldo View Post

                        It's "Pog mo thon", and I've only heard that from Americans pretending to be Irish. ( Seen it n a few bumper stickers and T shirts as well)
                        When The Pogues band first broke in the US, their name's alleged "Irish" origin got a lot of press, and a lot of people bought into that bad or mangled 'Gaelic." If only to prove how in-your-face they could be. Much like the band...

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X