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So. Totally. Done. With wearing a kilt.

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  • #31
    Re: So. Totally. Done. With wearing a kilt.

    Originally posted by wysper View Post
    I didn't know that, do they always play electronic pipes?
    That is Celtica isn't it?
    Look closely at the finger holes- there are sensors where the should be black holes.
    Slainte Leibh/ Slan Leat, Bob Cameron

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    • #32
      Re: So. Totally. Done. With wearing a kilt.

      Originally posted by Klondike Waldo View Post
      Look closely at the finger holes- there are sensors where the should be black holes.
      You guys are awesome - pretty much nothing escapes the forumites notice.
      Greg

      “Don't tell me the sky's the limit when there are footprints on the moon.” ― Paul Brandt

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      • #33
        Re: So. Totally. Done. With wearing a kilt.

        Originally posted by Pip01 View Post
        Greetings to All,
        (and with the permission of those
        to whom this section is dedicated),

        One of the very nice things about waking up in this mortal
        world is that... after a point... you get to choose... and then
        to do... what you want!!

        And while I may agree that the skirts and blouses are very
        nice... and obviously much more comfortable... it really isn't...
        my call.

        With this... as with all else... choose... what best befits your
        wishes.

        Go out... dressed as you will... play well... have a good time...
        and have fun with it!! (That's... why any of us... do it!!

        Regards,

        Pip01


        Exactly so. After a certain age some concepts of propriety and custom can become irksome and tedious.

        I've always thought that garish Hawaiian shirts, surfing jams and rubber zories truly bring out the highlander in a man, in a way that a bolt of wool simply cannot. I call it the Aloha Oy look.
        Last edited by David; 09-04-2016, 01:56 AM.

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        • #34
          Re: So. Totally. Done. With wearing a kilt.

          Originally posted by David View Post
          Exactly so. After a certain age some concepts of propriety and custom can become irksome and tedious.

          I've always thought that garish Hawaiian shirts, surfing jams and rubber zories truly bring out the highlander in a man, in a way that a bolt of wool simply cannot. I call it the Aloha Oy look.
          I had a drummer buddy who was in the Navy at Pearl Harbor before the war, he would have called that "going pineapple".
          Slainte Leibh/ Slan Leat, Bob Cameron

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          • #35
            Re: So. Totally. Done. With wearing a kilt.

            I love the idea of wearing something more suitable to the individual's body, preference and comfort. While I highly respect tradition and, on most, kilts look great, they can be a pain to get to fit and aren't always the most comfortable. My band finally had a kilt made for me and I don't know how many times I had to call the company to assure them that, yes, the measurements I'd given them are the ones for my body. The kilt does fit nicely but it just isn't becoming on my form.
            When I play solo for a gig, I always ask if they want me to kilt up. Most of the time they do but once in a while they leave that choice to me. It would be great to have some other options that are still evocative of the Highlands. I agree that presentation is also important.

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            • #36
              Re: So. Totally. Done. With wearing a kilt.

              I let the music speak for itself. I am not Scottish and don't like dressing up and enduring endless "are you Scottish" queries. They are often baffled when I answer in Hebrew.

              I've no problem of any kind with those who like Highland gear. But no playing the fabled Highlander or the Highland regimental soldier for me. I have heard of a very prominent piper who charges extra for suiting up.

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              • #37
                Re: So. Totally. Done. With wearing a kilt.

                I was told by a kiltmaker that a woman who plays the pipes should wear a tartan skirt and a blouse and heeled shoes when she plays solo, however, when I get a gig most often I am asked if I am going to wear the "full outfit". I know exactly what they want so I wear the entire outfit. I don't really mind because it's not about how I look, it's how I play that concerns me most. I do like those dresses though- that could be striking at a wedding if the bride wants an updated piper look!

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                • #38
                  Re: So. Totally. Done. With wearing a kilt.

                  Originally posted by David View Post
                  I let the music speak for itself. I am not Scottish and don't like dressing up and enduring endless "are you Scottish" queries. They are often baffled when I answer in Hebrew.

                  I've no problem of any kind with those who like Highland gear. But no playing the fabled Highlander or the Highland regimental soldier for me. I have heard of a very prominent piper who charges extra for suiting up.
                  I would be a millionaire for every time someone asked me if I am Scottish or Irish because of my Auburn hair! I actually mostly Lebanese but my mother's father was Scottish so I just say yes and leave it at that because we are "performers" and they want someone transported from the highlands of Scotland to perform. One woman actually told me she wished she made the kind of money I do- she thought errantly that I just go from gig to gig all day long wearing my kilt. How little she knows!

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                  • #39
                    Re: So. Totally. Done. With wearing a kilt.

                    I always take the thing as a joke.
                    Last edited by Paul Graham; 10-02-2016, 12:27 PM.

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                    • #40
                      From a guy's perspective:

                      I was asked to play a small gravesite service one very cold winter day, and being a work day, the only way I could accommodate the request was to not wear a kilt as I didn't have time to change.

                      I explained that to the family (they were fine with that) and I wore a shirt/tie, navy dress pants and navy wool top coat, and added the glengarry. It looked very professional, and I think neater than the kilt look.

                      I've been playing for 23 years, and honestly, the clothing is my least favorite part of piping.

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                      • #41
                        While I can respect the opinion of others, I personally would never play in public in a performance way without putting on a kilt. Not only because it is expected, but because I completely respect the tradition and the legacy and am a big booster of all that tradition represents. Soldiers (and the old clansmen) once wore the kilt / plaid day in and day out in all conditions -- I'd be ashamed to let a passing heat wave or cold front shame me into breeks!

                        Anyway, I love Highland clothes and wear them whenever I can. Doesn't have to be piping even. Nor does it have to be formal wear or pipe band uniform. Just wear the level that's comfortable for you. Casual but correct. We've let the fake kilts and utilikilts monopolize the look too long!

                        PS: Late edit: I now see that this discussion is in the Ladies Lounge or some such segregated forum. So pardon me for straying. My comments were directed at men's opinions (or so I thought), and the question of proper ("proper?") Highland wear for females and female pipers is sort of terra incognita for me. But seems interesting, if contentious. All the lady pipers I've seen are with bands so in public and competitions are wearing the band uniform, which is always made to men's norms. If this is uncomfortable to women, that's a pity and should be addressed as much as possible, but it's understandable that the meaning of "uniform" is, well, uniform. Maybe something as simple as better tailoring would help? I remember, too, when it wasn't considered proper for women to wear sporrans with kilt skirts. Which just seems silly. It's all gotten so complicated!!
                        Last edited by piper909; 11-03-2021, 11:05 PM.

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