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Lament For Rory Mor (Cumha Ruairidh Mhoir)

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  • Lament For Rory Mor (Cumha Ruairidh Mhoir)

    Looking for slow airs on Ceol Sean today and found this from The Kilberry Book of Ceol Meadhonach

    https://ceolsean.net/content/CeolMea...ook01%2018.pdf


    I like the tune, but went to check if there were any recordings of it and found the versions from Colin MacLellan and Gordon Walker, who are certainly no slouches, a bit different particularly with B taorluaths at the end of phrases. https://youtu.be/16DF5RiqiJw
    Which would be the more acceptable version? Book or piping master?
    Before you start fixing problems with your reeds, check to see if the bag or stocks are leaking.
    http://www.youtube.com/user/Marcblur?feature=guide

  • #2
    Which version appeals to you?

    That one!

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    • #3
      Colin is playing grips there, not taorluaths.

      I mean, it's not a well known tune, so it's not like you'd be confusing people. Do as you please is not a bad rule.

      That said, with Gaelic tunes in particular there are words that go with them, and if you leave out notes you're leaving out words...

      (On that note, I notice the Gaelic title is in the genitive, meaning the Gaelic is "Rory Mor's Lament", or "Lament of Rory Mor", not *for* Rory Mor). Assuming the Gaelic is spelt correctly, of course.
      BagpipeTechnique.net
      Tunes from Donald MacDonald

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      • #4
        Did you also listen to Alastair MacDonald singing this lament with strings on YouTube? He begins with our B but plays a run through C and D to the F, which I find quite appealing. I just tried that run on my pc and included a D grace note on that C. That's probably the way I'd play the piece.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Roger Huth View Post
          Did you also listen to Alastair MacDonald singing this lament with strings on YouTube? He begins with our B but plays a run through C and D to the F, which I find quite appealing. I just tried that run on my pc and included a D grace note on that C. That's probably the way I'd play the piece.
          It's difficult to describe the emotions conjured by the human voice singing piobaireachd, but Mr. MacDonald's rendition is, as you say, very appealing. At the very least, it illustrates the way music was taught and handed down from teacher to student long before CD's, tapes, or even written scores.

          thanks Roger

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