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Your first piobaireachd and who taught you it

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  • #16
    Re: Your first piobaireachd and who taught you it

    The first Piobaireachd lesson I ever got was with Bob Worrall at a workshop, and it was Munro's Salute. The first tune I committed to memory was The MacIntosh's Banner, and I was taught that by Willie Muirhead.
    Kenton Adler

    For best results - PLAY LOUD

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    • #17
      Re: Your first piobaireachd and who taught you it

      Coeur d'Alene Pipe School, I did the 2 week course and Ed Chilton taught us MacIntosh's Lament. Lovely tune but so repetitive it's hard to keep your place.

      Later in life, I heard Lament for Mary MacLeod and HAD TO learn it. Mark Ryan, a student of Andrew Wright for many years, taught it to me. Mark has since started a weekly Piob class at his house and a few of us used to meet regularly (pre-Covid) to learn and play together.

      The more I learned about Piobaireachd and about Mary MacLeod, I learned that there's a lot more to the pieces of Piobaireachd than meets the eye and it's those subtle differences that make a Piobaireachd "beautiful and substantial" versus 'a nice tune'.....especially so with Mary MacLeod (which is not a great tune for a beginner but you couldn't tell me that 8 years ago!).

      Jenni
      Don't take life seriously! You'll never get out of it alive!

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      • #18
        Re: Your first piobaireachd and who taught you it

        There is a group lead by Norm McDonald Wed. afternoons for the past 10 years that we collectively learn piob. My list since joining 5 years ago.

        1st piece, MacIntosh's Lament, yes long and repetitive but helped with the basics

        2nd piece, Caber Feidh Gu Brath, love the ground

        3rd piece, Glengarry's Lament, took a bit to comprehend the manuscript but a nice tune maybe one day I'll get the a mach off.

        We are presently working on Macdonald of Kinlochmoidart's Lament and the ground and first variation of The Lament for the Children.
        General Order May 2, 1779; by Order of the Commander-in-Chief The Queen's Rangers henceforth shall be known as the "1st American Regiment".

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        • #19
          Re: Your first piobaireachd and who taught you it

          Also at the Coeur d'Alene piping school:

          Lament For The Old Sword

          Colin Gemmell and Evan MacRae
          proud Mountaineer from the Highlands of West Virginia; Son of the Revolution and Civil War; first European settlers on the Guyandotte

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          • #20
            Re: Your first piobaireachd and who taught you it

            MacCrimmon will never return. I tried teaching myself that one and then I moved on to The Desperate Battle of the Birds, and ordered a tuition tape from Donald Macleod. From then on it was mostly learning from records and through courses with the army (militia) Macdonald of Kinlochmoidart and MacCrimmon's Sweetheart.

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            • #21
              Re: Your first piobaireachd and who taught you it

              Mac Donald of Kinlochmoidarta's Lament No 1. Taught to me by my teacher Davy Baird. He was a long time student of John Wilson. I studied with Davy for about 10 years and learned a number of piobaireachd from him. He was a great teacher.


              John D
              John Desormeau

              It is not good to have zeal without knowledge, nor to be hasty and miss the way.
              Proverbs 19:2 (NIV)

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              • #22
                Re: Your first piobaireachd and who taught you it

                "MacLeod of Raasay's Salute" learned from Jimmie McColl, Oban gold medalist. I learned so much from him in the brief time I had under his tuition. Wonderful piper and human being.

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                • #23
                  Re: Your first piobaireachd and who taught you it

                  Originally posted by Jay Close View Post
                  "MacLeod of Raasay's Salute" learned from Jimmie McColl, Oban gold medalist. I learned so much from him in the brief time I had under his tuition. Wonderful piper and human being.
                  Jimmy has a heart of gold. How is he doing these days?
                  Cha de\an a' phluic a'phiobaireachd

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                  • #24
                    Re: Your first piobaireachd and who taught you it

                    Macintosh's Lament was my first piobaireached. I learned it from John Ryan, P/S of the old U.S. Air Force Pipe Band and my teacher when I was a kid.
                    -Steve

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                    • #25
                      Re: Your first piobaireachd and who taught you it

                      As others mentioned, Coeur d'Alene, where I was exposed to one I don't recall by Evan MacRae. The first learned was Struan Robertson's Lament with instructor Colin MacKenzie.

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                      • #26
                        That was 15 years ago "Sir James macDonald of the Isles Lament" Ican't remember the teacher. It was a workshop.
                        Groeten van Bartje, The "Whalepiper" uit Holland


                        http://www.Whalepiper.nl

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                        • #27
                          My first, and so far, only, piobaireachd is the first one in the yellow College of Piping book; the title escapes me at the moment but certainly will come to me as soon as I hit "post reply". It is a lovely tune, though simple. I have been working on it on my own though I did get some help from Wes Shephard of Winnipeg some years ago. I'm eager to start work on "Lament for the Harp Tree" but will need to consult with my pipe major for guidance on that one.

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                          • #28
                            My first was Lament for Alasdair Dearg taught to me by Greg Abbot. I really enjoy the tune as my wife is a descendent of the MacDonalds of Glengarry.

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                            • #29
                              Ancient Warrior's Sorrow- taught to me by my instructor, Bill Caudill
                              “Cogito, ergo armatum sum: I think, therefore I am armed.”

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                              • #30
                                Desperate Battle of the Birds. Seumas MacNeill was my teacher.

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