For all things related to Piobaireachd ...

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Influence of clans on piobaireachd?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Influence of clans on piobaireachd?

    Hi all,
    I'm looking for info about the influence of clans on piobaireachd.

    McCrimmons, macDonalds etc

    Who can help me?
    thnx Bartje.





    Groeten van Bartje, The "Whalepiper" uit Holland


    http://www.Whalepiper.nl

  • #2
    Essentially none. The high age of piobaireachd composition came after the decline of the mediaeval clan system. By the time we have named pipers we can assign to compositions, the system has entirely given way to a more English conception of aristocracy.
    http://www.callingthetune.co.uk
    -- Formerly known as CalumII

    Comment


    • #3
      I would suppose that such mediaeval clans, who may have helped to support, patronize, provide for the tutoring of pipers, could be said to have indirectly influenced the development of piobaireachd. Though, I do not mean to suggest that absent clan supports, piping would not have endured.

      This puts to mind another, somewhat similiar question of the influence of the modern era and contemporary competition system, societies, associations on piobaireachd. I'd like to think that the big music could survive without competitions; might even flourish.
      “Where’s my beer?”

      Comment


      • #4
        I think only inasmuch as those clans that had so-called "hereditary pipers". I think of the MacDonalds and Macrimmons, though there were others.

        Comment


        • #5
          You only need to pick up any book of Piobaireachd and look at the titles to understand that they are in the main part connected to the Clan system and the history of Scotland.
          The Clans were in full swing when Ceol Mor was in its golden age. Books like "Legendary & Historical notes on Ceol Mor" compiled by Roy Gunn would be a perfect place to start. The "115 Piobaireachd Tutorials", by Bill Robertson has historical notes on tunes as does The "Kilberry Book of Ceol Mor" and "Binneas is Borreraig". It is far too in depth a topic to cover on a wee post in a forum. There are some very interesting programs on YouTube about Scottish clans, one of which talks about Clan McLeod being the great patrons of the arts. Once the clan system was discouraged from 1746 and the hereditary pipers started to vanish, Ceol Mor suffered a serious decline.
          www.schoolofpiping.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by PMT View Post
            You only need to pick up any book of Piobaireachd and look at the titles to understand that they are in the main part connected to the Clan system and the history of Scotland.
            The Clans were in full swing when Ceol Mor was in its golden age. Books like "Legendary & Historical notes on Ceol Mor" compiled by Roy Gunn would be a perfect place to start. The "115 Piobaireachd Tutorials", by Bill Robertson has historical notes on tunes as does The "Kilberry Book of Ceol Mor" and "Binneas is Borreraig". It is far too in depth a topic to cover on a wee post in a forum. There are some very interesting programs on YouTube about Scottish clans, one of which talks about Clan McLeod being the great patrons of the arts. Once the clan system was discouraged from 1746 and the hereditary pipers started to vanish, Ceol Mor suffered a serious decline.
            This is a very difficult, and emotive subject for many reasons.

            Tread carefully when treating some of the above as an 'Authority' on the subject. FWIW I think the age of Celtic romanticism had far more of an influence on Piobaireachd than the clan system preceding it. The landed gentry changing tunes because 'they know better' as your social superiors, and the monoculture of competition (again presided over by your social superiors regardless of their musical acumen) have all altered the art form from what it once was.

            Proof if it were needed, that 'tradition' is not a fixed entity, but one that evolves relative to the environment it is in.

            PS - the clan system was discouraged from 1746. That's one way saying it. Ethnocide is another.
            Last edited by Mac an t-Sealgair; 09-11-2021, 02:08 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              The key event that is relevant is really the incorporation of the Statutes of Iona in 1609, which required chiefs to educate their children in English speaking, Protestant schools. Within a generation this meant the conception of a Gaelic chief as the pinnacle and lynchpin of Gaelic culture was gone. It's no accident that this time period coincides with the collapse of bardic and harping culture, and the rise of the pipe in replacement. So what happened? Was the pipe the Gaels adopted the common lowland instrument of the time? Quite possibly. What we really know for certain about the bagpipe in Gaelic culture before 1600 can be summed up as 'sod-all'. There is myth, and legend, and there is material that could well have been mobile between oral, harp, and bagpipe cultures, but that's it. As I pointed out above, the vast majority of people and events that can be dated in the titles of extant piobaireachd are in the post 1700 era, and the majority post 1750. Piobaireachd as we understand it is essentially a Georgian era culture, so far as we know. And while the people that paid for and maintained its performers were clan chiefs, and still at this time Gaelic speakers, they were also English speakers brought up in English culture with Enlightenment values.

              http://www.callingthetune.co.uk
              -- Formerly known as CalumII

              Comment

              Working...
              X