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Reed case… how do you store your reeds?

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  • Reed case… how do you store your reeds?

    Last night I pulled out my “Kinnaird Piper's Pal Reed Storage Case” as I wanted to start breaking a new reed and all four reeds were heavily covered in mold… This is the second time that this has happened with this case… What other solutions are available, and what works best for you?
    I’m in the process of ordering for new reeds… I’m not sure how many more than four do I need to have on the shelf at any one time… but a case that holds 4 to 6 reeds I think would be a good start.

    Thanks for the education! Have a good day!

    Leo

  • #2
    I tend to store them in whatever they are packaged in, and leave them in the room my pipes and whatnot stay in. If I were in a region with big humidity swings, I would probably wrap that container in something airtight if it wasn't airtight to begin with.
    http://www.callingthetune.co.uk
    -- Formerly known as CalumII

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    • #3
      Ditto on what Calum does. They stay in the packaging until one needs to be selected. The rest, once tested and not used, go back into their case. The only storage is the reed I'm using, and that's in Tone Protector.

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      • #4
        i've both the Tone Protector (for current) and just recently y
        that same Kinnaird case for the spares. Geez, guess I should go check them for mold.

        Pretty sure you can give the moldy reeds a wipe with Hydrogen Peroxide (3%) to de-mold.
        “Where’s my beer?”

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        • #5
          I use a Pipers Pal case but have suffered mold attacks before. I have also used airtight pill bottles or small Nalgene screw top bottles before. I still keep reeds that are not in current rotation in a small Nalgene bottle. I have thought about turning a red cedar liner for a small airtight plastic jar before too. The idea is that the cedar would provide a buffered reservoir of moisture, absorbing some when you put wet reeds in it and offering some moisture back to the reeds if they are dry. Cedar is also naturally resistant to mold and rot.

          Kevin

          Comment


          • #6
            Greetings to All,

            Well... I find that I both--am not--and have not--found myself--
            and my chanter reeds--bedeviled--by these mentioned maladies--
            and the same holds equally true--of and for--any of my drone reeds.

            Now--in my case--'tisint so much--any application of any scientific
            principle--on my part--as it is--just my--"Plain Dumb Luck"--coming
            from back in that Time--when we all--had to flim-flam up any piping
            gear that we suddenly needed--and had to--"make do"--with any of
            the materials--and objects--that we had--ready to hand... :-)

            And so--for chanter reeds--and for most of the time--they simply went
            into those small-ish and tight-capped Rx round plastic containers for
            pills--and with a bit of standard paper towel--to absorb moisture.

            Likewise--for the several--if not many--"extra" drone reeds--that seem
            to always grow in their numbers--(and not unlike rabbits in the park :-) --
            almost any of the smaller cardboard--rectangular--and not too tall boxes--
            with that same bit of--"moisture control" :-) paper towel thrown in--seems
            to have--"Done the Trick"--and equally--as well.

            Now I know--that there are many--Fancier--and much more Fashionable--
            methods of--"reed storage"--but for my funds--and of which I have saved
            beaucoup!!--and the ease of acquisition--and the efficacy--of my staving
            off
            --The Great Green God of Mold!!--I seem to find myself--"In the Clear."

            And what e'er the choices--trusting that All--may find what fits The Best--
            for them. :-)

            Regards to All,

            Pip01








            My friends all know,
            With what a brave carouse...

            Comment


            • #7
              I really like the tone protector approach… so I’ve dumped the moisture retaining “rocks/gelatin” out of the Pipers Pal case… too much variability and instead inserted a single 75% Boveda 2-way humidity pack. It fits easily into the case, and I like the case it’s functional I’m just hoping to prevent excess growth. Hydrogen peroxide was used to clean up the reeds I’m hoping there’s no lingering effects.

              Comment


              • #8
                Store them in their case in the fridge

                Comment


                • #9
                  Regarding the nearly airtight clear plastic sleeves that some reed provide with their reeds...I poke two small holes ...one on the top and the bottom.....a fat mm diameter..with a hot ice puck tip. This allows moisture to escape....reeds stay dry. A few minutes of warm up tunes rehydrates the reeds nicely. I don’t overthink it.

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                  • #10
                    I use a tone protector Reed case at the moment, but it's pretty new, and I don't really have enough information to tell you if it would or wouldn't do the same thing as the Piper's pal. Hopefully not. Up until I bought this case, I had just left them in the packaging they came in, often a little bag in a foamed box. I also bought a "shipping case" that holds I think 6-8 reeds and it's just a plastic formed container with spaces for reeds. I was going to use that till I got this case.
                    Don't ask my neighbors about my piping skills. They don't know...

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                    • #11
                      I, too, use the Tone Protector reed case and have done so for over a year with ZERO mold problems!
                      "Stuff your eyes with wonder, live as if you'd drop dead in ten seconds. See the world. It's more fantastic than any dream made or paid for in factories."
                      Ray Bradbury

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                      • #12
                        I've used Piper's Pal reed storage case and reed protector caps for years and have never had a problem with mold. Maybe I've just been lucky. I also have a Tone Protector reed cap, which I bought out of curiosity aroused by all the hype, but don't find it any more or less effective than the Piper's Pals I've been using for years. Both protectors work well to keep my reeds in good condition, in my experience.
                        Ian
                        http://www.thepipersden.net

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by acadianpiper View Post
                          I've used Piper's Pal reed storage case and reed protector caps for years and have never had a problem with mold. Maybe I've just been lucky. I also have a Tone Protector reed cap, which I bought out of curiosity aroused by all the hype, but don't find it any more or less effective than the Piper's Pals I've been using for years. Both protectors work well to keep my reeds in good condition, in my experience.
                          Regarding the chanter caps, I agree that both products are effective. I just find the Tone Protector easier than tending to the hydrophilic beads, etc. in the Piper's Pal. As for mold, I've found it curious how some have problems with that and some (like us, apparently) have no issues at all with either product and mold.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Well, I'm like everyone above. I once had mold using a piper's pal case, and stopped putting moisture in it; It's the most convenient way to carry extra reeds in the pipe case. Also use pill bottles, and the deep reserves, (used long ago but not yet dead) are in old tobacco tins. I probably have enough of the latter to equip a (badly tuned) pipe corps, but occasionally one comes into service; a quick dip into cold water, and we're away. My two current chanters each have a piper's pal cap, kept slightly moist. If the band is playing outdoors in cooler weather, I put nothing in the cap so the moisture will be drawn out of the reed.

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                            • #15
                              I keep my spare reeds in the long plastic tubes, with holes, as mentioned above, or in empty "Fisherman's Friends" tins, with molded inserts as some reed makers send them in. some sets are in the plastic tunes with a Fisherman's Friend or Altoids tin. I regularly dip them in a Hydrogen peroxide solution as a mold and bacteria preventative.
                              Slainte Leibh/ Slan Leat, Bob Cameron

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